World Humanitarian Summit

Picture this: People are on the move; they haven't eaten for days, and some are dying. They need burial cloths. Burial cloths are more important to them than food, as it helps ensure a peaceful afterlife. In a poor village, the next life means hope if the dead are prepared. Hope is all they have.
One year ago, the ground-breaking Charter on the 'Inclusion of People with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action' was launched
In wars and disaster zones, a simple explanation is that humanity is a force that advances the idea of life, with dignity. To strengthen the idea of humanity for people caught in conflicts, epidemics and disasters, we could borrow some ideas from the Olympic motto: Citius (faster), Altius (higher) and Fortius (stronger).
Ending the UK's commitment to spend just 7p out of every £10 of our national wealth on international aid is not the answer. This will send the wrong signal to both the countries we are asking to commit to the same spending, and importantly to the hundreds of millions of the world's poorest who we are supporting to lift out of poverty once and for all.
A few weeks ago I was in the Central African Republic, one of the most complex humanitarian crises I have experienced. 420,000 people are internally displaced and over 2.3 million people are in dire need of humanitarian assistance. This is about half of the population of the CAR.On top of going through numerous coup d'états since its independence, this war-torn country also has some of the lowest human development indicators in the world.
The image of Aylan Kurdi, the Syrian toddler washed ashore on a Turkish beach, is one of the most resonant of our times. A
Nepal Red Cross Society In April and May 2015, Nepal was struck by two huge earthquakes. Over 8,000 staff and volunteers
"Now I'm older it feels as though I'm a burden and people aren't interested in me." These are the words of 86 year old Mariya
Today, Monday 23rd May, the UK's Minister for International Development Justine Greening, Gordon Brown, and other influential figures will announce a new fund for education in emergencies at the World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul. Save the Children is launching a new campaign at the summit to ensure that no refugee child, anywhere in the world, is out of school for more than a month.
A new poll of more than 27,000 people in 27 countries shows that 80% of those interviewed - in countries on all continents - would accept refugees in their country. The poll, carried out for Amnesty International by the global consulting firm GlobeScan, contrasts sharply with anti-refugee attitudes expressed by extremist organizations and politicians claiming to speak on behalf of "ordinary people" in their countries.