World Malaria Day

If you've kept an eye on social media this World Malaria Day then by now I imagine you've discovered the Secret CEO's true
Education is so vital. When you give people help and tell them what the symptoms are and what to do if they feel ill, it not only prevents them from getting malaria in the first place but teaches them how to get the right treatment to save their lives.
Malaria has been a persistent blight for thousands of years. Spread by mosquitos, the oldest surviving records of the disease appear in ancient Chinese medical texts dating back to 2,700 BC. Since that time, efforts to tame it have been equally tireless.
The need to end malaria for good is as important as ever when half of the world's population is at risk and a child dies from this preventable disease every two minutes. How can we let up when life-saving treatment for each of those children costs less than a cup of coffee? Together we can #EndMalaria.
Of all the headlines coming out of America so far this year, the one that excited me most was President Barack Obama's bold
The Thai-Cambodian border is a known hotspot for the emergence of drug resistant malaria and recently resistance to the most effective drug for treating malaria, artemisinin, has been discovered in this area.
I'm a firm believer in Winston Churchill's adage, "No one should waste a day". World Malaria Day (25 April) is most definitely a day we don't want to waste because the stakes in the battle against the world's oldest disease are so incredibly high.
A week ahead of World Malaria Day, there is much that rings true in his words, for in the fight against the world's biggest killer disease, many small things (backed by some big commitment) have led to extraordinary progress...
As the 2015 deadline for the Millennium Development Goals draws closer, World Malaria Day is a key advocacy date for those of us working on the ground to drive the achievement of the health-related goals, especially in the malaria endemic countries of sub-Saharan Africa.
Malaria is obstinate. A massive effort by the international community along with the determination of committed individuals, scientists, health workers , governments, charities and other organisations have made a huge dent on its impact. Globally, cases are down 25%, deaths are down 42% since 2000 - but malaria is far from gone.