World Water Day

This year's World Water Day theme is "Nature for Water" to encourage people to "look for the answer in nature".
Every time you feel that splash of water, you don’t take it for granted
Canada has more freshwater per capita than most countries, but not as much as we might think, and that's a problem.
A woman and her child on their way to collect clean water in the village of Nerculo, Niassa, Mozambique. WaterAid/ Panos
When you next turn on your tap to make a cup of tea, have a shower or water your plants, don't forget about the hard working donkey, the tap who is working hard to connect people with water and provide them with a better life, all over the world.
Since we marked the first UN-declared World Water Day in 1993, the world has made incredible progress. Yet there remain more than 650million people in the world without access to clean water, who are faced with a daily struggle involving long dangerous walks or expensive black-market vendors, just to get water that is likely neither clean nor safe to drink.
The Cycle of Water The 22nd March is World Water Day and we are clear - we need the privileged world to wake up to the droughts
Today is World Water Day and this morning over 650million people around the world woke up with no clean water. That's one in ten people. Forced to drink, cook and wash with dirty water, people are at risk of getting sick and missing vital days of work and education, trapped in a cycle of poverty. Last month WaterAid invited me to travel to India with my 12-year-old daughter Glenys to see the situation for myself. I visited Sanabenakudi, a remote village in east India, to understand what everyday life is like for people living without access to safe water...
Climate change, inefficient water delivery systems, and intensive agriculture are making it more and more difficult to get clean water. As the world observes World Water Day on March 22, we need to consider what we need to do to solve water problems in Central Asia and the rest of the world. It's up to all of us.
Every day, women around the world spend many hours walking long distances to collect clean water and provide supplies for their families. In fact, a shocking 750 million people globally - approximately one in nine people - lack access to safe water and acceptable sanitation.
To mark World Water Day on Sunday 22nd of March, the international water and sanitation charity WaterAid has asked the public to reflect on what water means to them through the film competition sH2Orts.
WaterAid is calling on governments to double the amount of aid going to water and sanitation. But whatever is spent, it should be targeted at those communities that need it the most, where it can do the most good for the most people.
You may be surprised to learn that over the past decade, a third of the money pledged by aid donors for water and sanitation has failed to be delivered. That's US$27.6 billion out of the US$81.2 billion committed since 2002. This is a staggering amount of money. It could have helped hundreds of millions of people gain access to water and sanitation.
The theme of this year's world water day is 'cooperation'. At first glance, cooperation might appear a somewhat passive sentiment; but, in the context of the global water challenge, meaningful change and progress will only happen through cooperation, collaboration and partnerships.
It's hard for us to imagine life without the humble loo. It's a basic necessity; a UN-recognised human right. However, for an overwhelming two thirds of the population in South Asia, a loo is a luxury that's out of reach.
Friday marks the 20th anniversary of World Water Day but it is hardly a cause for celebration as millions of people still
The Huffington Post pictures of the day brings you the very best images from around the world chosen by our own photo editors