ww1

Much recent writing on the Great War has veered between the highest-ranked and the humble: a determined rehabilitation of Haig at one end, with plain-spoken voices from the ranks at the other, whether individual Tommies who survived to tell their story, or whole battalions of 'Pals'. Lost in all this has been the story of the men arguably most responsible for British obduracy and eventual success - the officers of the line.
It began with a missing war memorial at a rugby club. Rosslyn Park, founded in 1879 had a clubhouse plaque to those killed in the 'Second Great War', including Prince Obolensky, England's Russian winger who crashed his RAF Hurricane in 1940. Nothing existed for the first Great War, 1914-18. Why no memorial to them?
George Howson was the most idealistic of headmasters. When he took the helm at Gresham's School in Norfolk, he wanted to
The dawn of a New Year is a looking forward to what is to come and for reflection, a time for taking stock. There are two things we know will happen during 2014...
Field Marshall Lord Kitchener is not everybody's choice as the heroic figurehead of the First World War. Yet it will be the
Historians have hit back at Michael Gove's assertions that "left-wing" programmes like Blackadder have whitewashed Germany
EastEnders writer Tony Jordan is behind a new series following the fate of two young soldiers in the First World War. The
Like smoke drifting across no man's land as the sound of the guns and the mortar finally fell quiet, the Christmas truce of 1914 has been shrouded by the mists of time. A historical event which occurred early in the First World War and one many of us are familiar with; yet it has the feel and texture of legend as much as fact.
A battered old suitcase which gives an insight into the life of a First World War nurse has been found at the back of a cupboard
The 100-year anniversary of the Christmas truce during the First World War may be commemorated with a football match in Flanders