Young Adult Books

In my previous posts about reading, I have failed to address precisely why I value books so much. In this post, I want to address a question I have been asked many times since I started writing about this topic: why read at all?
Leonardo Di Caprio's impassioned Oscars acceptance speech urging collective responsibility for Climate Change demonstrated
True young adult fiction is intended, as the name implies, to be read both by adults and those in their late teens. I do not make allowances for my young readers in my writing, and neither do most authors. The storylines are definitely not childish.
There is something whimsical, compelling, even frightening, about the idea of a coastal community. A group of wind-beaten
I was lucky enough to get the opportunity to interview Keren David, author of Salvage, to explain her inspiration for writing the book, the issue of broken family relationships and if everything (as is suggested by her title) can eventually be 'salvaged'...
Recently the YA blogosphere, Book-tubers and the section of Twitter especially reserved for that of YA book fanatics have been talking about one thing and one thing only: the YA Book Prize, a prize for UK and Irish YA books set up by the publishers The Bookseller.
YouTube might not be the first place you go for that most low-tech form of entertainment: reading. And yet, YouTube has become the unlikely hero of a reading renaissance, thanks to the BookTubing phenomenon.
We visit YouTube too, of course, but there's a massive generational divide on this. According to a recent Ofcom study, teenagers watch half the amount of TV their parents watch. And they spend 600% more time watching online videos than adults. That is not a typo. Six hundred percent.
Perhaps it was being put deep under by the anaesthesia, for I am told it really is a little like dying. Well the closest one comes to dying without actually... dying; when you are sedated enough for them to cut into you. Maybe it was that which dropped me deep into myself, enough to touch the stuff that really mattered. The debris hidden behind decades of conditioning shot to the top.
I hope that my books - and whatever forms the stories may go on to take - will capture the imagination of their readers, create a vehicle for discussing environmental issues, and encourage young people to tackle global challenges by becoming the scientists and engineers of tomorrow.