Youth Culture

Clubs have always been the true melting pots of cities, where people from all elements of society mix in a way they wouldn't anywhere else - they're not just where people dance, they're where dreams are made, plots are hatched, relationships made, collaborations formed and even businesses launched.
How many times have I seen "Stop it, 2016!" in the past few weeks? Graphs showing the upsurge in celebrity death, memes about George R. R. Martin writing the year, demands to put all sorts of international treasures in cotton wool. But shouldn't we be ready for this?
I wish I could say that young people are exaggerating and not taking responsibility for their actions. But I hear on a daily basis numerous accounts of young people being assaulted, physically, sexually and emotionally abused, unsupervised, fearing for their lives daily within their local communities, experiencing poverty, exploitation, grooming, a lack of understanding from parents, ambivalence from teachers and strained relationships with the Police.
The film I plan to create differs from perhaps any undertaken to date. In recent years there has been a formulaic attitude to films about North Korea in which they revolve around highlighting the regime as a 'tyrannical pariah state'. What I am seeking to create is the first attempted apolitical film in perhaps the most politicized country in the world.
As I ponder the vicissitudes of this strange new world it occurs to me that we live in a culture that not only is youth oriented but people are acting it out in a variety of ways. Whether it's spiritual vitality, jumping out of planes at 90 or running marathons way into their dotage we seem to be defying gravity. What's wrong with that
This new generation of image-obsessed males seems derived purely from previous, slightly hipper, forms of narcissism, in a churning spiral of self-adoration. These boys have been weaned on the teat of naff celebrity as a means to an end. Poor pumped-up lambs with lifetime debt.
With his latest offering, Brown has veered slightly away from the sermonic qualities of Soul for Sale but the humour hasn't suffered for it. He's ever so slightly mellowed but this show still provides the caustic and learned humour that has become his hallmark.
In the last months of 2013 there were a few choice op-eds and journalistic pieces that displayed a worrying ignorance of thought on social matters...
I do like popular music. Can you imagine if the Olympic opening ceremony had culminated with a bit of jingoistic Elgar or, God forbid, - Delius? Hey Jude gets a stadium singing, but it is only one moment in time. The classical lives on a far grander canvas.