youth vote

In a recent piece of research undertaken by YMCA looking at what matters most for young people, when asked if the UK should remain part of the EU, 72% of the more than 2,000 young people surveyed said 'yes'.
So far, so fun and games. No threats or violent language or anything. A light day at the office, really, for any aspiring Katie Hopkins of the liberal, pro-EU left. But on a more serious note, here are some interesting considerations that seem to me to emerge from the strength of the reaction and the nature of the criticism.
If Mr. Cameron truly does want Britain to remain part of the EU, there's clearly no tactical advantage to be gained from excluding this age group from the referendum. But it's not just about seeing the UK stay in the EU; it is rather about the principle of empowering the broadest range of voters when taking decisions about their future.
I implore young people in the UK to vote on Thursday 7 May and make their voice heard. I implore young people to use their vote to ensure that political parties use their manifestos to tackle issues that affect young people.
If we inform our lives at our convenience through technology, and our primary news channel is no longer managed by the traditional broadcasting corporations but has shifted to our rapid social news feeds, then how do we engage future generations in the meatier topics of economics and politics?
Each individual has a different politics; a university student studying politics has a different experience of politics than a medical student does. And they both have a difference experience of politics from someone who does not go to university.
I had become yet another cog in a big political wheel and couldn't escape the feeling that I had cheated those I set out to help at the start of the campaign - the young and apathetic. They don't watch BBC Parliament on a random Tuesday afternoon while this was being broadcast or care if I'm lobbying behind closed doors.
As much as our society is digital, it is every bit as cynical. The next decade will make great strides forward for communication, health, business and sport, but let it also be the decade that politics repairs its broken reputation. Nobody knows what will pick politics up from the gutter, but online voting might just be a start.
I want you to vote whatever your vote might be. Enjoy it. It's yours.
There has been a collective failure to attract a younger audience to politics and current affairs. This is in very large part the fault of the parties themselves. Trying to blame the media would be foolish and wrong. They do, however, have a contribution to make.