PARENTS

The Upside Of No Longer Being Pregnant

01/05/2009 10:27 | Updated 22 May 2015

Many women get depressed over the fact that they are no longer pregnant. They miss having a baby tucked warmly, safely away inside of them. Some believe that post-partum depression in part derives from this feeling. But, I can personally attest, there is a bright side to no longer being pregnant. For one thing, you shed an average of seven pounds of baby and a few pounds of water, placenta, and...well...goo, when you give birth. Throw in breast-feeding and fewer weird cravings and your diet should get (relatively) back on track. Also, that feeling you had toward the end of your pregnancy where you wanted something but didn't know what it was, and nothing you came across really appealed or satisfied? Well, that goes away too. How about that terrible, unbelievable heartburn? Well, I experienced it as I was labouring, and, wouldn't you know it, the moment that baby came out of me the heartburn left as well.

Other things to look forward to once you're no longer preggers include being able to sleep on your stomach (bad for the back, I know), sleeping on your back and taking a bath in a lot of really hot, steaming water. Or hitting the jacuzzi. With doctor's clearance, of course. Most doctors prefer new mums take six weeks before they do a bath or hot tub. Same goes for exercising, driving and heavy lifting. Trust me, you'll actually want to do these things as soon as you're told you can't do them for six weeks. Also, for those of us who avoided soft cheeses and deli meats? Check with the doctor, but you can probably begin eating those again too.

Know the best upshot of no longer being pregnant (besides getting to have sex at some point without that tummy getting in the way)? Getting to hold your beautiful baby, see what she looks like, hear her sweet tiny voice, and finally meeting this magical, mysterious creature who will forever change your life in the best way possible. And that's a heck of an upshot. Plus eventually you get to drink again. There's a bottle of eighteen-year-old single-malt Scotch next to a highball glass with my name on it around here somewhere, and with doctor's instruction (current wisdom holds you should breast-feed baby and have just one drink immediately after so it has time to work through the system before feeding baby again) I'm going to find it. Enjoy!

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