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Slugs, Snails And Puppy Dog Tales: Brotherly Love

14/09/2010 09:36 | Updated 22 May 2015

Watching my twins interact is an interesting sport. Although they were introduced to the concept of sharing in the womb, it doesn't mean they are any good at it. It always amazes me how an unloved and discarded plaything, becomes instantly irresistable the moment it is picked up by a sibling.

Zach will absently begin to play with a toy that Jonah had not shown the slightest interest in in weeks. But the moment it is in his twin's hands he will beetle across the room and attempt to snatch it from him as if it were is favourite thing in the world.

It has to be said that Jonah has the upper hand, as he is able to walk, so if he can gain possession of a toy he can toddle away with it keeping it out of his brother's reach.

But Zach is wise to this and has developed a sort of spin and duck move, whereby he swivels round on his bottom, whilst simultaneously hunching his body around the object of desire to hide it away from his brother.

This is the point where Jonah brings in the big guns and repeatedly slaps his twin on the head in an attempt to beat him into submission. The ensuing squeals and squawks normally draw my attention and I step in and try to referee the fight. My usual tactic is to remove the offending object, which leaves them both in tears but at least it puts an end to the physical violence – until the next time.

But it's not all about fighting for toy supremacy with the twins. Sometimes they can melt my heart with their tenderness towards one another. While we were on holiday Zach stumbled while he was crawling and crumpled onto on his face in tears. Jonah toddled to his side, leant down and offered him a hand to help him up. Of course Zach can't stand up yet, but it's the thought that counts.

Then, the other day, Zach was in floods of tears when I confiscated a toy light sabre that he had been using to hit me in the face. Traitor that he is Jonah was there once again, gently stroking his sobbing twin's back as if to say "There, there. Never mind". Perhaps they learnt something during all those months sharing a womb after all.

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