Stress Keeps More Workers Off Sick

25/10/2010 17:06 | Updated 22 May 2015

An increasing number of people are taking time off work because their stress levels have gone through the roof. According to a report by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, stress-related absenteeism has risen over the past year - in fact, stress is the main cause of workers being off sick in the long term among those who work in the public sector.

Flickr, Jenna Carver

The report, which surveyed more than 500 firms, suggests the cost of work absence in the public sector is around £900 a year for every worker - that's £300 more than the average across all types of British workers.

So why are public sector employees more stressed than those who work for private companies? It's because they have more challenging jobs, say experts. Social working, policing, nursing and healthcare, as well as teaching, are all high-pressure occupations, they say.

And no doubt the planned cuts in public sector posts announced by the government last week will only make workers more stressed as they worry over whether or not they'll have a job in the not-too-distant future.

The report also suggests mental health problems such as anxiety and depression are on the up too, with more than a third of workers from all types of companies saying they feel more anxious and depressed, compared with just a fifth of workers from the year before.

Is the recession to blame for the fact more people are depressed at work? Do public sector workers really have more stressful jobs than those who work for private firms? Or do you love your job and are fed up of all this doom and gloom?

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