The Wedding Invites Take Shape (No Thanks To Me)

11/02/2011 17:17 | Updated 22 May 2015

Sunday a Tweet arrives from Super-Organised Mother: 'Just printed 50 invites. No going back now.' (Do not be impressed by the Twittering, she'd learn Japanese if it meant she could communicate more quickly with her children.)

15 minutes later, an email arrives: 'Also, just bought 50 metres of tape.'

My invites, when they finally arrive, will be a unique mix of my various wants and Super-Organised Mother's hard work.

When my sister got married a few years back, from the lofty heights of singledom, I pronounced that when I got married, I'd be texting the invites and possibly eloping.

To be fair, despite dedicating at least 80% of her weekends since I got engaged to helping plan the wedding, Super-Organised Mother hasn't once reminded me of this (High-Fashion Hippy Sister, currently wafting around the beaches of Bali, on the other hand, has. Multiple times.)

And so to the actual invites. Inspired by a press day invite I had to the Anthropologie store when it opened on Regent Street, I wanted something on homemade paper, with sewing tape and buttons. Super-Organised Mother did mock some up with knotted raffia, which – she pointed out – would be cheaper and easier to make, but I opted for the tape instead, which takes a full five minutes to fray the end of on each and every invite, so it doesn't look too perfect.

The blank cards themselves come courtesy of Paperchase (I tried buying homemade paper from eBay, but didn't read the small print and ended up with 15 rolls of bright purple paper, rather than cream, so went old-school and bought from a shop where I could actually see the merchandise first.)

The font inside was shamelessly stolen from the Prêt-à-Portea menus at The Berkeley (it is possible to steal a font, and a hell of a lot easier than the cutlery, thank goodness), while the luggage labels for the save the dates are from

Anyway, I could continue, but Super-Organised Mother has her version of the tale. CLICK HERE to read and see the invites in all their glory.


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