The Apprentice Winner Babyglow Sleepsuit Goes On Sale

09/03/2011 18:50 | Updated 22 May 2015

The Babyglow premiered on last night's The Apprentice, achieving the highest ever number of sales for a product since the programme began.

Babyglow, billed as the world's softest thermometer, is a range of baby suits and sleepwear that change colour the moment the baby gets too hot - a continual concern for parents. They also change back to their original colour when the baby has reached its normal body temperature again.

Babyglow operates without batteries or stimulation from any accessories or electricity. The body temperature is enough to make the clothes perform their function. The Babyglow suits can show both the effects of fever and external heat such as overdressing, hot rooms or exposure to direct sunlight.

An estimated seven million viewers watching The Apprentice saw Jane Ebejer, wife of the product's inventor Chris Ebejer brief contestant Liz Locke on how to pitch the Babyglow to retailers in an attempt to secure orders. During the pitches, one retailer described Babyglow as "a brilliant product"; another commented that "the product itself is fantastic".

By the end of the task, the apprentices had secured "orders" worth £122,000 for their products, a record for the programme, including a notional order for 10,000 Babyglow units from Kiddicare, the UK's leading online retailer of babyware, and an impressive win on the programme.

The Babyglow sleepsuits, which are available in blue or pink, are now available on line at from £29.95 for a pack of two.

"We were thrilled that not only the contestants, but also the retailers featured on The Apprentice recognised the great potential of Babyglow," said Ben Muis, Babyglow's Marketing and Commercial Director.

"The fact that babies aged up to about 24 months cannot regulate their own body temperature and have to rely on their parents or carers to do it for them, means that the products have a real role to play in helping see when your baby may be too hot or may have a fever."

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