STYLE

What Does The Royal Couple's Body Language Tell Us?

17/03/2011 14:43 | Updated 22 May 2015

Have you, like us, been lying wide awake at night worrying about the longevity of the impending royal marriage? Are Kate and William really perfect for one another? Well, the experts have been examining this conundrum and the verdict is in: Thankfully, this wedding is meant to be. Why? Because they are, apparently, in perfect synch, according to body language aficionado Judi James. Click on the gallery below to find out why.

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The art of the royal wave

"Bending the hand back on the wrist could look hugely dominant, more like a hail than a wave, but with their arms held low it's got a pseudo-infantile look that implies cuteness and fun rather than stuffy formality. It's called the windscreen-wiper wave and is often used by A-list celebs who want to promote an image of being normal and down-to-earth."

The art of the royal wave

When in Belfast earlier this month the couple had synchronised waves - called 'mirroring' - with both using their left hands to greet the crowds with their palms facing the well-wishers. According to Jame: "'Like-bodied' suggests 'like-minded", while the "the open palm display signals openness and approachability that is only slightly tempered by the fact that it is very similar to the signal for 'Stop'." So now we know.

The art of the royal wave

"The princess had a knack of sending body language tie-signs out to the public that made us feel as though we knew her personally, like little eye-rolls, glances or self-effacing smiles as she attended formal occasions."

The art of the royal wave

The Queen's wave is "feminine-formal" and a little "stilted" while Philip opted for more of a hail than a wave "something much more active and full of machismo".

The art of the royal wave

Charles and Camilla's wave was more synchronised and showed "warmth and friendliness", says James, but like his father the heir to the throne used his arm right up to and including the shoulder to show his status and masculinity.

The art of the royal wave

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