From Jane Austen To Stewie Griffiths: The World Of Child Geniuses

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Seven-year-old Oscar Selby who scored an A* in his maths GCSE in 2010, at less than half the age most children take the exam
Seven-year-old Oscar Selby who scored an A* in his maths GCSE in 2010, at less than half the age most children take the exam

Following the recent success of child novelist Mia Foley Doyle, we decided to take a look at other talented children who have proved their talents at a very early age.

Most, if not all, of you will have come across the astounding works of Ludwig van Beethoven, but did you know he composed his first piece, the Dressler Variations, at the tender age of 12?

Experts tend to disagree when Wilfred Owen began to write poems - some say he was 10 or 11, and others claim he was 17 - but you have to admit, even that's pretty impressive.

Tragically, the poet died age 25, but not before penning some of history's most poignant and touching war poetry.

John Keats, another prolific English writer, was one of the key figures in the Romantic movement. Despite his life being cut short at the tender age of 25, Keats left a legacy of poetry which is still studied and revered to this day.

Not forgetting their female counterparts, Jane Austen wrote her first novel Love and Friendship when she was just 14.

But the child geniuses are not just restricted to the bygone days of old. In recent years, several children have made headlines for their mind-boggling achievements, but also provoking the still-unresolved debate of "hothousing".

And, one for the Family Guy fans: we know Stewie isn't real, but if he was, we're pretty sure he'd be furiously writing a bestseller by now, probably around the subject of 'How to take over the world before you grow up'.

Also on The Huffington Post

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