Despite the modern age of digital camera phones and CCTV every which way you turn, capturing an elusive ghost on film is harder than you would think.

Even when a passing spirit is snapped in a London theatre, the paranormal photographer must state that his pic is the genuine article to a skeptical public.

However, the superstitious Victorians didn't seem to have any trouble catching a ghoul, as these vintage 'ghost' pictures prove.

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A man clinging to a tree in the face of an apparition in a forest, circa 1865.

From Mrs Bentley's deceased sister photo-bombing her portrait, to ectoplasm oozing from the neck of medium Marthe Beraud, it appears that those from other side were itching to make an appearance in family photo albums.

Flick through our slideshow of some of the spookiest snaps of vintage Victorian 'ghosts':

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  • A photograph of a group gathered at a seance, taken by William Hope (1863-1933). The information accompanying the spirit album states that the table is levitating - in reality the image of a ghostly arm has been superimposed over the table-stand through double exposure. Hope's spirit album photographs use multiple exposure techniques to render the appearance of ghostly apparitions. Hope founded the spiritualist society known as the Crewe Circle and his work was popular after World War One when many bereaved people were desperate to find evidence of loved ones living beyond the grave. Although his deception was publicly exposed by a private investigator in 1922, he continued to practice. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)

  • A portrait photograph possibly taken by William Hope (1863-1933). A young woman's face appears as if floating above the sitters, draped in a cloak. Hope may have already held her photograph in his studio, or he may have asked the couple to supply photographs of deceased relatives under the pretence of using the image to contact the spirit world. Hope's spirit album photographs use multiple exposure techniques to render the appearance of ghostly apparitions. Hope founded the spiritualist society known as the Crewe Circle and his work was popular after World War One when many bereaved people were desperate to find evidence of loved ones living beyond the grave. Although his deception was publicly exposed in 1922, he continued to practice. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)

  • A photograph by William Hope (1863-1933). A woman's face appears above the couple - identified at the time as the sister of a man prominent in the Spiritualist Church. Her cloak adds to the ethereal effect. The signature in the upper left hand corner is by one of the sitters, to authenticate the plate. The couple are the parents of the person who compiled the spirit album. Hope's spirit album photographs use multiple exposure techniques to render the appearance of ghostly apparitions. Hope founded the spiritualist society known as the Crewe Circle and his work was popular after World War One when many bereaved people were desperate to find evidence of loved ones living beyond the grave. Although his deception was publicly exposed by a private investigator in 1922, he continued to practice. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)

  • A photograph of a man, taken by William Hope (1863-1933). A woman's face appears in a 'misty' cloud to the right of the man - identified as that of his deceased first wife. Hope may have already held her photograph in his studio, or he may have asked the man to supply her photograph under the pretence of using the image to contact the spirit world. The signature in the upper left hand corner is the sitter's, authenticating the plate. Hope used multiple exposure techniques to render the appearance of ghostly apparitions. He founded the spiritualist society known as the Crewe Circle and his work was popular after World War One when many bereaved people were desperate to find evidence of loved ones living beyond the grave. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)

  • A photograph of Will Thomas, taken by William Hope (1863-1933). A man's face appears in a haze of drapery on the right of the photograph. Thomas, a medium from Wales, did not recognise the superimposed image. Thomas has signed the bottom of the photograph, 'Sincerely Yours Will Thomas' - perhaps this indicates a friendship with Hope. Hope's spirit album photographs use double and even triple exposure techniques to render the appearance of ghostly apparitions around the sitter. Hope founded the spiritualist society known as the Crewe Circle and his work was popular after World War One when many bereaved people were desperate to find evidence of loved ones living beyond the grave. Although his deception was publicly exposed in 1922, he continued to practice. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)

  • A photograph of Mrs Bentley, once the President of the British Spiritualists Lyceum Union, taken by Wylie. A superimposed image - that of Mrs Bentley's deceased sister's face - appears at the lower right of the photograph. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)

  • A strange visage appears on a piece of cloth next to the head of medium Marthe Beraud (aka Eva C) during a seance, circa 1910. Picture taken from 'Les Phenomenes dits de Materialisation' by Juliette Bisson. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

  • A couple are terrified by a spectral apparition, circa 1880. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

  • 1865: A ghostly figure appears to a couple eating their dinner in a country cottage. London Stereoscopic Company Comic Series - 225 (Photo by London Stereoscopic Company/Getty Images)

  • circa 1865: The ghost of a woman appears to a girl at prayer by her bedside. London Stereoscopic Company Comic Series - 183 (Photo by London Stereoscopic Company/Getty Images)

  • circa 1865: A man clinging to a tree in the face of an apparition in a forest. London Stereoscopic Company Comic Series - 72 (Photo by London Stereoscopic Company/Getty Images)

  • circa 1865: An apparition appearing to two country folk in their kitchen. London Stereoscopic Company Comic Series - 10 (Photo by London Stereoscopic Company/Getty Images)

  • circa 1865: An apparition causes havoc by menacing two people in their kitchen. London Stereoscopic Company Comic Series - 13 (Photo by London Stereoscopic Company/Getty Images)

  • circa 1865: A frightened man praying on his knees to an apparition. London Stereoscopic Company Comic Series - 17 (Photo by London Stereoscopic Company/Getty Images)

  • circa 1865: A ghost floating slowly towards a dishevelled man hiding in a corner. London Stereoscopic Company Comic Series - 169 (Photo by London Stereoscopic Company/Getty Images)

  • CIRCA 1865: A ghost attacks a man with a sword. Early double-exposure by G. Maerkl. Vienna. Carte-de-visite Photographie. Arond 1865 (Photo by Imagno/Getty Images)

  • If viewed from certain angles, glass on its own can act as a mirror. In the past this was used to create 'ghosts' on stage. The ghost was actually an actor under the stage. An angled plane of glass reflected light from the ghost towards the audience, who would see the ghost but not the glass. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)