Boy, 3, Needed 100 Stitches After Dog Attack

14/08/2014 16:46 | Updated 22 May 2015
Boy, 3, needs 100 stitches in his face after attack by Japanese Akita dog

A three-year-old boy needed 100 stitches in his face and suffered a fractured eye socket after he was mauled by a Japanese dog in a pub.

Trafford-James Jackson-Poole could be left scarred for life after he was attacked by a Japanese Akita at his family's local pub in Newbold, Derbyshire.

His distraught mother Gemma Jackson says that her young son was lucky not to lose an eye and is now calling for the dog to be destroyed to prevent similar attacks.

Gemma, 23, told how the family were getting ready to leave their local pub when their son wandered into another room and was attacked by the Akita.

"I heard a barking noise and then Trafford-James came in holding his face," she said.

"He was screaming and covered in blood. The Akita had literally ripped a chunk out of his face. "It all happened so quickly and the first thing I thought was 'is he going to die?' I was in complete shock."

The boy was kept in hospital for 24 hours after needing immediate surgery on his left cheek and treatment for a fractured eye socket, and he will need a further operation on January 24 to correct his damaged skin.

Gemma, of Newbold, Chesterfield, who is also mum to Jordan, 11, said: "I recently heard that the same dog attacked another child. This should never have been allowed to happen and to ensure this doesn't keep happening, the dog needs to be destroyed."

Doctors are hopeful that Trafford-James has not suffered nerve damage following the bite, but won't know until the swelling on his face goes down.

A Derbyshire police spokesman said of the most recent attack: "A child was bitten on the face in the Nag's Head on December 30 and inquiries into the incident are ongoing."

Marston's, the brewery which owns the Nag's Head, said: "This matter is currently in the hands of the police."

Japanese Akitas are powerful dogs that can grow to weigh more than nine stone. They are not included in the Dangerous Dogs Act, but there has been several attacks by the breed.

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