PARENTS

Creepiest Baby Ad Ever? Baby Cuts His Own Cord During Birth

14/08/2014 17:02 | Updated 20 May 2015

Is this the creepiest CGI baby ever? Advert shows baby cutting its own cord

A baby delivers himself before Googling how to cut his own cord, in this disturbing advertisement for a mobile provider.

We all love a good funny baby video, and advertisers have been keen to cash in on this popular viral trend - often by using CGI to make babies do impossible stunts, such as the Evian rollerskating babies.

But one firm has taken CGI baby antics to a whole new level - one which is unarguably hard to forget, although not for the reasons the advertisers intended!

The advert entitled Born for the Internet opens on a woman in labour. The camera focuses on the doctor helping to deliver her baby and that's when the first unsettling thing happens - a tiny hand reaches out between the woman's legs and pokes the doctor on the nose.

The baby then dances out of his mother, to the strains of Diana Ross's song I'm Coming Out, and things only get weirder from there!

He uses a tablet to Google how to cut his own umbilical cord and then takes a selfie with a nurse, before using GPS to navigate his way out of the hospital.

Story continues after the video

Since Russian company MTS Telecom released the advert aimed at an Indian audience in February, it has racked up more than 24 million views on YouTube.

The company responsible for creating the advert - Mumbai-based Creativeland Asia - claim it is now the most-viewed advert to come out of India.

Sajan Raj Krup, Founder of Creativeland Asia says the inspiration for the advert came from his own children:

"By the time my daughter was one, she already knew the password for my phone and how to swipe through pictures," said Kurup told NBC News. "I thought, 'My God! If this is how kids are now, imagine what they're going to be like in the future.'"

We've seen the rise of toddler selfies, children social networking and five-year-olds learning to make apps, but babies using the internet to learn how to cut their own umbilical cords? That's a future we'd rather not imagine, thanks very much MTS.

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