PARENTS

'Mum, Dad, Stop!' Embarrassing Parents On Facebook

14/08/2014 17:02 | Updated 20 May 2015

Shocked 12 year old on computer unsupervised

Oh, how some of us regret accepting mum or dad's friend request on Facebook. The incessant liking of all your posts, the embarrassing childhood photos they upload, status updates that say things like 'Hi Becky, how are you?' and were clearly meant to be comments.

Parent cringe on Facebook comes in many forms; from TMI updates (do you really want to read a status about mum and dad's 'dirty weekend'?) to the comments telling you how cute you are in your latest photo - which all your mischievous friends immediately rush to 'like'.

And then there are those relatives who, despite being total Luddites, have somehow managed to find their way onto social media, and think you're the right person to answer their most basic questions about technology (all in caps-lock, of course).

However, you probably don't regret clicking 'accept' as much as these teenagers, who found out that having mum and dad (and even grandma) on their Facebook means opening themselves up to a world of potential humiliation.

Even worse - for a teenager, having the watchful eye of a parent on your Facebook means you can't get away with nuthin'. A careless status can invite a barrage of questions and a swift grounding.

Check out some of our favourite examples of when having a parent on Facebook seriously backfired.

#1. The thoughtless boaster

embarrassing facebook parents

#2. The wannabe badass

embarrassing facebook parents

#3. The long-suffering grandchild

embarrassing facebook parents

#4. The thwarted emo

embarrassing facebook parents

#5. The perennially misunderstood teen

embarrassing facebook parents

#6. The devastatingly honest dad

embarrassing facebook parents

#7. The uninvited wingman

embarrassing facebook parents

#8. The over-sharer

embarrassing facebook parents

#9. The just plain brutal

embarrassing facebook parents

#10. The overambitious matchmaker

embarrassing facebook parents

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Teenagers
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