Men Who Do Housework Get Less Sex (It Says Here)

12/12/2014 13:00 | Updated 20 May 2015

man doing housework

Housedads: put down your mops and pack away your rubber gloves – because all that housework is costing you sex!

Yep, it's (kind of) true: men who do chores don't get as much bedroom action as their lazier counterparts.

Researchers from the Juan March Institute in Madrid studied data based on relationships of 4,561 middle-aged US couples over 20 years, including their sex lives and how they divide household chores.

The study, which was published in the journal American Sociological Review, found that home tasks such as cooking and cleaning are traditionally perceived as women's work – and 80 per cent of housework is still done by women.

But men who did do their fair share of so-called 'feminine' tasks had sex less often than men who do little but scratch their nuts in front of the telly.

In fact, men who didn't pull their domestic weight, had sex one and a half times more a month than those who cleaned the toilet.

Really? If ever there was an excuse for a chap to ditch the washing up, now you have it!

Sabino Kornrich, a sociologist at the university, told Live Science: "What we do in the house is really strongly tied to how people think of themselves as men or women or as masculine or feminine."

He said women may see men doing 'feminine' jobs as less sexually attractive.

Alternatively, couples with similar roles may feel more like siblings than lovers, he added.

However, Constance Gager, a sociologist at Montclair State University in New Jersey said the results may not apply to young couples who grew up in times when gender roles have largely changed.

She found the opposite applied – that when tasks are not seen as gender specific, men have more sex when they do more housework.

We're not convinced by the first report. How little like sex do you feel after an evening of cleaning up after your family?

More on Parentdish: Our top 10 housework moans

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