PARENTS

Baby Name Trends 2015: Popular Names Predictions

23/01/2015 06:00 | Updated 20 May 2015

Mother kissing baby girl's cheek Popular baby names in 2015 will be drawn from sources as diverse as flowers, the Bible, and 90s high schools, according to our predictions based on analysis of the latest baby name data.

We've ploughed through reams of statistics to help you stay ahead of the curve and let you know the big baby name trends you can expect to see in 2015.

Girls' names tend to rise and fall in the popularity stakes with alarming swiftness, with fewer reliable centuries-old stalwarts than boys. One of the few consistent trends among parents of baby girls over the last decade is a fondness for vintage.

The Edwardian revival (Ivy, Violet...) currently has a firm hold, but we're guessing that the fad will pass in the next few years, with parents looking to the inter-war generation for inspiration. Look out for baby Junes, Dorothys and Jeans.

While boys' names tend to come from a smaller pool and remain in vogue longer (in fact, almost half of the top 20 boys' names in 2013 were also in the top 20 a century before), there are still noticeable trends emerging.

For centuries, parents drew on a handful of major biblical names, meaning that history is overflowing with Johns, Matthew, Jameses and Josephs. In recent years, this pool has expanded to include some Old Testament biblical characters, such as Joshua, Isaac and Noah.

Now these once-novel additions have themselves become mainstream, driving parents to delve deeper into the Bible for original name choices. Based on their steadily-climbing popularity, we predict a swarm of little Ezras and Isaiahs in nursery classes near you.

Both boys and girls are increasingly feeling the influence of European trends when it comes to naming choices. Many of the newer names on the UK Top 100 have made the top 10s in France, Germany and Scandinavia.

Take a look at the gallery below to see our top 10 predictions for baby names trends in 2015.

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