PARENTS

Banning Mobile Phones In School Could Improve Children's Test Scores, Study Finds

18/05/2015 10:59

It might be hard to prise that smartphone out of your child's hand in the morning, but the battle may be worth it as it could improve their schoolwork.

A study has shown that banning mobile phones from schoolchildren would give them the equivalent of an extra week's worth of lessons per year.

Schools in Birmingham, London, Leicester and Manchester took part in the study by the London School of Economics, which found that test scores improved by 6.4% when phones were banned.

children mobile phone school

Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy were the authors of the report, titled 'Technology, Distraction and Student Performers'.

They found that low-achieving pupils would gain the most from having their phones banned.

When low-achievers didn't have devices to distract them, their test scores improved twice as much as those who were already well-performing at school.

They also found that those children eligible for free school meals positively gained from not having their phone with them.

Beland and Murphy concluded: "The impact of banning phones for these students was equivalent to increasing the school year by five days.

"Allowing phones into schools will harm the lowest-achieving and low-income students the most. Banning the devices can lead to an improvement of around six per cent in tests, they added, which is thought to be the same as an extra hour's studying a week.

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The authors said, however, the study was not as effective for high-achieving students.

By 2012, 98% of schools either did not allow phones on school premises or required them to be handed in at the beginning of the day.

Since 2007, teachers have been legally allowed to confiscate such items but the Government has made no official policy about the use of phones in schools.

But if your child's school doesn't ban phones, are you willing to take that first step?

History of the Mobile Phone

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