PARENTS

Fearless 12-Year-Old Boy, Miller Wilson, Touches 'Deadly' King Cobras On The Head

01/03/2016 12:21 GMT | Updated 01/03/2016 12:59 GMT

A fearless 12-year-old boy was filmed as he touched two king cobra snakes, which are reported to be "deadly".

Miller Wilson, from Australia, who frequently uploads short documentaries about his adventures with wildlife, found two king cobra snakes while travelling in Western Bali.

After coming across the animals, Wilson noticed the snakes slightly hissing, so deliberated with locals before deciding to touch them.

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Miller Wilson was travelling in western Bali in search of wild animals

Wilson claims the snake has "enough venom to kill a fully-grown elephant" in their venom glands located behind their eyes.

According to cobra.org, the king cobra’s venom is mostly comprised of neurotoxins, which will brutally attack a person's central nervous system and just one bite can lead to death within thirty minutes.

"The one thing I've always wanted to do with cobras is actually touch them on the head just like that with your hand," Wilson tells the camera in the video.

"Seeing this one was wild and extremely angry, I didn't know I could actually do it so after asking some locals, they said it should be ok so here's how that went down."

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The next day in Wilson's video diary of his adventures, he comes across another king cobra and successfully touches its head again.

Speaking of his trip to Bali in the video's description, Wilson can't contain his excitement at touching the snakes.

"After the three-day experience, I managed to find pangolins, stingrays, loads of snakes, porcupines and lizards," he wrote. "But most importantly cobras!

"The thing to top that all off was I managed to touch two king cobras on their heads, without them being restrained. It was such an amazing experience and I will 100% be going back."

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Wilson reiterates no one should attempt any of the catches in the video.

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