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Reflections on an EastEnders Funeral

08/07/2016 16:00 | Updated 08 July 2016
BBC

This week the funeral of the great pub landlady, Peggy Mitchell, took place in Albert Square. It was full of wonderful East End traditions, like the horse drawn bier led by the funeral conductor and the people standing by in respect. There were hints that Peggy had specified what kind of funeral she wanted - and it was certainly a very traditional, even old-fashioned, affair in the local church.

But these days a Church of England led funeral needn't be traditional, whether it takes place in the local church or elsewhere. People can wear brightly coloured clothes, the coffin might be wicker or felt or hand-decorated, it could be draped with a favourite sports shirt, balloons might be released - whatever reflect that unique life and the love of God within a framework of reflection, prayer, thanks and commendation into God's care. The EastEnders funeral reminded me of the time I took the funeral of a pub landlord - there were nearly 1,000 people present, a wicker coffin, the singing of Waltzing Matilda and lots and lots of tributes. I spent a lot of time with the family discovering what would make this funeral helpful, and to this day I remember them and pray for them.

Whatever the circumstances, the vicar talks with the family beforehand, finding out key family contacts and tensions (that would have been interesting in the Mitchell clan!) discovering what made this person uniquely loved and special to those around him or her. The vicar may encourage the family to make a tribute, talking about their own personal memories, and will be there alongside on the day, ready to offer a steadying arm or even take over if emotions became too much. Together with the Funeral Director the minister is responsible for the service, making sure it all works smoothly, offering care and support as needed - and should something go wrong, the vicar will be there.

Christians believe in a God who made every human being uniquely, who knows every step we take, walks with us through our journey in life, so celebrating and giving thanks is a central part of every Church of England led funeral. The camera cut away from the funeral service, but I do hope someone spoke about Peggy with affection. If I'd have been taking her funeral I would definitely have used the line 'Get out of my pub!" somewhere in the service! But funerals are more than just thanksgiving: there is grief and loss, sometimes anger or regret, and a church service will also make space for holding those emotions, letting go where appropriate and finding comfort to face the future.

Above all a Church led funeral offers a message of hope - a hope that death is not the end and that both we who have to carry on living and those whom we love but see no longer are all held in the great love of God. Our recent research around Church of England led funerals showed that the timeless words 'ashes to ashes, dust to dust, in sure and certain hope of the resurrection to eternal life' have a powerful resonance with people, even though their full meaning will take us all a lifetime to grasp.

A good vicar - and there are many like Revd Juliet Stephenson from Newcastle-upon-Tyne, the current Funeral Celebrant of the Year - will offer pastoral care before, during and long after the funeral. Sometimes that's the space to light a candle, sometimes the space to remember and sometimes a listening ear. I know EastEnders isn't real [it isn't is it?] but I hope that all who are faced with organising a funeral will know that the Church of England is there for them, meeting their needs with compassion, humour, love and grace.

Rev Canon Dr Sandra Millar leads work on funerals for the Church of England

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