THE BLOG

Leeds United And The Pontus Mystery: Was Talisman Jansson Believing His Own Publicity?

20/03/2017 12:39 GMT | Updated 20/03/2017 12:39 GMT

After such a very impressive result as Leeds United earned against Brighton on Saturday, it's quite perplexing to have seen quite so many virtual furrowed brows across social media since. The reason, of course, is The Mystery of the Missing Pontus - why, oh why was Jansson benched?

In a way, it's an irrelevant question - Leeds won, so all is well. The margins between victory and defeat, though, are narrow - and we were only a slip or two from what might have turned into a full scale post mortem, had Rob Green not saved Liam Cooper from a spectacular own goal, for example. Or had Brighton capitalised on a couple of other defensive wobbles, and emerged winners. They say that being a lucky manager is at least as important as being a good manager. Garry Monk has shown over this season that he is arguably both - and it was certainly vital for United to do well and win, after what was, to say the least, a bold decision to drop his talismanic defender.

All we were told was that the decision made was the "best for the group". That's pretty much in line with what we are coming to know and love as the Monk Mantra; everything is done for the good of the team, the good of the group, the good of the club. The issues underlying this particular decision were not gone into - Garry is inviting us to accept that he knows what's best and can be relied upon to act for the good of Leeds United. But still, we can speculate.

I've been as impressed as anyone by the startling effect, the galvanising influence Pontus Jansson has had on Leeds United since his arrival in the first team. He's been a colossus, endlessly effective at both ends of the field, a giant unit of a bloke fit to fill that famous shirt. But, as a relatively young man (for a central defender), and as a mere mortal besides, Jansson is prey to human failings just as anyone else. And the truth is that there have been signs lately of the guy starting to believe his own publicity; buying into, perhaps, the "legend" status accorded him by so many, so soon. There have been times when Jansson has made challenges when perhaps he could have backed off, times when he's dived in and then been found out of position and unable to recover. Huddersfield away springs to mind. All in all, the more recent Pontus performances have not been quite of the same vintage as those that went before, and it's difficult not to wonder whether the boy's got a bit carried away with that early success, to the detriment of his finer judgement.

Leeds can be a difficult place to perform; for players of doubtful character, it can be a veritable snake-pit. Once the crowd gets on a player's back, you can sometimes see that player shrink and shrivel - and you know that the player will then have the devil's own job restoring the fans' faith in him. But, on the other side of the coin, the adulation of our crowd can have its downside too. Such a very vociferous set of fans we are, that - when we take a player to our hearts - it's a real production number. The player is levitated to hero status, then rapidly proceeds to be worshiped almost as a god. Jansson has had this treatment, since his amazing early impact and given his undeniable rapport with the crowd. He's had his own song, he's enjoyed his own one-on-thousands encounters with delirious fans in the wake of victories he's helped win. Perhaps - just perhaps - he's started to believe that he really could head that brick back. Perhaps the time had come to get the lad's feet back on the ground.

Some say he failed to acknowledge the fans after the Brighton match, a very un-Pontus-like thing to do. But we don't know what's been said to him. In the ultra-professional, hyper-focused environment of Garry Monk's Leeds United, maybe Pontus has been told to cool off the love affair with the fans, stop believing in his own legend, concentrate on doing the simple things well, and get his mind set on the team and the three points up for grabs. That seems likely to me, and appropriate, given the recent slightly diminished level of the Swede's performances.

There's also the issue of a forthcoming suspension for Jansson, depending upon further bookings ahead of an approaching deadline. From a pragmatic point of view, that might justify taking the lad out of the firing line in order to avoid losing him for a couple of games later on. But a vital match against the second in the league seems an odd time to be quite that pragmatic - and so I tend to favour the view that Pontus is being, in a reasonably gentle and fatherly way, taken down a peg or two.

I hope it works, and I hope that Jansson can come back stronger and wiser, fiercely focused on the team and its aims. Because, on his day, and along with fellow juggernaut Kyle Bartley, he's by far and away the best this league has to offer at centre-back. Liam Cooper did well yesterday, being slightly lucky to be saved from a calamitous misfortune by his own keeper. It's starting to look as though, with Ayling and Jansson to return, we have a decent four from six perm for our back line, with Coyle and Denton showing potential to raise that six to eight. Not bad for a "paper-thin squad".

Jansson will be back, we will all sincerely hope, as good and commanding as ever. But, for the time being, if he learns that he's not utterly indispensable - if he can absorb the truly legendary Billy Bremner's maxim of "Side before self, every time" - then this will be a lesson well learned, and we'll be getting back a better and more grounded hero.