Classic Kids' Clothes Beat Recession

03/07/2009 09:25 | Updated 22 May 2015

A surprising effect of the credit crunch is making itself felt in the sometimes controversial world of children's fashion.

Parents, it seems, are turning their backs on trendy items in favour of classics that will last.

It could be seen as a silver lining to the recession. The sight of young girls in high fashion looks set to be a thing of the past, at least for now.

I have often despaired at finding anything suitable for my three girls in particular, especially as they've got older. Especially something that didn't involve parting with huge sums of money.Luckily they feel much the same way (although I don't love everything in their wardrobe), which means we have managed to avoid dressing room tears over crop tops, items with unsuitable slogans or anything I would wear had I been younger and slimmer.

As people watch their pennies more, they are leaving children's high fashion items on their hangers for classic items that won't date and will therefore last longer, according to a recent report in USA Today.

Magazines are also highlighting more tasteful options, which teens are keen to copy. This filters down to younger children, influenced by older siblings, who are turning their backs on more adult style clothes for something that makes parents a lot happier.

It is also thought the Obamas, who dress their children in a classic, child-friendly style, are also swaying parents' tastes.

However the sigh of relief heaved by adults anxious to dress their children as children may be short lived. Experts predict that when the good times roll by again, so will high fashion.

Although not all children are interested in clothes, it does make the task of replenishing their wardrobe more palatable if the items in shops are fun, hard wearing and actually designed with them in mind.

Have you found it hard to dress your child, girls particularly, in a more classic style? Or do you shop secondhand for their clothes and bypass the fashions?

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