Events that took place the night the Costa Concordia sank will be reconstructed in court with the captain of ill-fated cruiser coming face-to-face with survivors of the tragedy.

Captain Francesco Schettino is currently facing charges of multiple manslaughter, causing a shipwreck and abandoning the cruise-liner.

32 people died when the cruise liner ran aground off the Tuscan island of Giglio with 4230 passengers and crew on board.

ssinking pictures

The events of the night will be recreated in court for survivors and families of the victims

In the preliminary hearing on Monday the contents of the Costa Concordia’s data recorder will be revealed. After experts reveal their evidence a judge will decide whether there should be a criminal trial.

"There is in us a hunger for justice" said the mayor of Giglio, Sergio Ortelli, commenting on the hearing.

According to survivors inside the court, Schettino appeared nervous and agitated, biting his fingernails and tapping his phone before the proceedings kicked off.

Special permission has been granted for Schettino to attend the Grosseto trial as he is still under a court order to remain in his home town of Meta di Sorrento, near Naples.

The proceedings are taking place in the town's 1300 capacity Moderna theatre which is closed to journalists. A handshake took place between one survivor of the disaster and the disgraced captain during a break in the hearing reported Huff Post Italia.

"We hope that the truth will be established soon," he told Schettino. "Yes, the truth must be ascertained," Schettino replied.

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A very tanned Schettino leaves his house in Naples (far left)

An audio recording between Schettino and Gregorio De Falco, a Coast Guard officer has already been leaked to the press.

Schettino was nicknamed ‘Captain Coward’ by the Italian tabloids after a recording revealed De Falco told the captain "Get back on board, for f*** sake," only for Schettino to tell the officer “it’s dark.”

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The rusting ship lists in the waters off Giglio

Schettino later claimed he “tripped” into a lifeboat but then supervised the rescue from the shore. Other reports claim the captain hailed a taxi home.

Engineering and naval experts have been handed a 270 page report of evidence from the night the Costa Concordia ran aground.

According to Huff Post Italia, the report contains evidence that Schettino ordered an officer to take a different route around Giglio. This is of particular significance as many blame Schettino for sailing the ship too close to the island to make a “salute”.

Schettino has claimed his decision to steer the ship into shallower water actually saved lives, however it is alleged there is evidence within the report that shows the manoeuvre impact was merely chance.

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Schettino has alleged his actions averted a worse disaster

Also under examination is whether the extent of tragedy could have been avoided if a state of emergency was declared sooner.

Costa Cruise executives were told there were problems on board 68 minutes before the order came to abandon ship, but the advice given by the cruise ship company's crisis management team appears to show Schettino was not urged to announce the emergency straight away.

Special permission has been granted for Schettino to attend the Grosseto trial as he is still under a court order to remain in his home town of Meta di Sorrento, near Naples.

Eight other officers and managers of Costa Cruises are also under investigation for their role in the disaster.

holidaymakers

Vacationing at the site of a disaster: The isle of Giglio is a popular destination for holidaymakers

Meanwhile the mammoth hulk of the Costa Concordia continues to form a blot the horizon of Gigilo. By tonnage it is largest passenger ship to ever have sunk and the salvage operation is one of the most expensive ever recorded, with the current cost sitting at £186m.

Gigantic cranes and complicated derricks frame the ship, preparing to haul the ship out onto its base. It will then be towed to a shipyard and dismantled into its reusable parts.

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  • A view of the partially sunk Costa Concordia wreckage next to the Giglio Island, Italy, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. The first hearing of the trial for the Jan. 13, 2012 tragedy, where 32 people died after the luxury cruise Costa Concordia was forced to evacuate some 4,200 passengers after it hit a rock while passing too close to the Giglio Island, is taking place in Grosseto Monday Oct. 15, 2012. Captain Schettino, who was blamed for both the accident and for leaving the ship before the passengers, is scheduled to attend the hearing. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

  • FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012 file photo, a sea platform carrying a crane approaches the grounded cruise ship Costa Concordia off the Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy. Costa Crociere SpA says work to remove the capsized Costa Concordia cruise ship from its rocky perch off Tuscany will begin early next month and is expected to take 12 months. Costa said in a statement Saturday, April 21, 2012, the U.S.-owned company Titan Salvage won the bid to remove the ship, which struck rocks off the tourist-dependent island of Giglio on Jan. 13, when the captain made an unauthorized maneuver too close to shore. (AP Photo/Pier Paolo Cito, File)

  • FILE - In this, Sunday, Jan. 22, 2012 file photo, people stop and look at the grounded cruise ship Costa Concordia off the Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy. Costa Crociere SpA says work to remove the capsized Costa Concordia cruise ship from its rocky perch off Tuscany will begin early next month and is expected to take 12 months. Costa said in a statement Saturday, April 21, 2012, the U.S.-owned company Titan Salvage won the bid to remove the ship, which struck rocks off the tourist-dependent island of Giglio on Jan. 13, when the captain made an unauthorized maneuver too close to shore. (AP Photo/Pier Paolo Cito, File)

  • FILE - In this , Sunday, Jan. 22, 2012 file photo, the cruise ship Costa Concordia lies on its side off the Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy. Costa Crociere SpA says work to remove the capsized Costa Concordia cruise ship from its rocky perch off Tuscany will begin early next month and is expected to take 12 months. Costa said in a statement Saturday, April 21, 2012, the U.S.-owned company Titan Salvage won the bid to remove the ship, which struck rocks off the tourist-dependent island of Giglio on Jan. 13, when the captain made an unauthorized maneuver too close to shore. (AP Photo/Pier Paolo Cito, File)

  • Richard Habib

    Titan Salvage Managing Director Capt. Richard Habib talks to journalists at the foreign press club in Rome, Friday, May 18, 2012. The head of a U.S.-owned marine salvage company chosen to remove the wreck of the Costa Concordia cruise ship from the waters off Tuscany is predicting the vessel will be ready for towing by early next year. Habib says the ship, now lying on its side on rocky seabed near the port of Giglio island, will be back in an upright position by the start of winter. He told reporters in Rome Friday that once afloat, the wreckage will be towed to an Italian port to be determined for demolition. Thirty-two people perished when the Concordia slammed into a reef off Giglio on Jan. 13. The Concordia's captain is under house arrest while being investigated for alleged manslaughter and abandoning ship during evacuation. (AP Photo/Roberto Monaldo, LaPresse)

  • Journalist prepare their equipment in front of the Teatro Moderno theater where the first hearing of the trial for the Jan. 13, 2012 tragedy, where 32 people died after the luxury cruise Costa Concordia was forced to evacuate some 4,200 passengers after it hit a rock while passing too close to the Giglio Island, is taking place, in Grosseto, Italy, Monday Oct. 15, 2012. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

  • A view of the partially sunk Costa Concordia wreckage next to the Giglio Island, Italy, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. The first hearing of the trial for the Jan. 13, 2012 tragedy, where 32 people died after the luxury cruise Costa Concordia was forced to evacuate some 4,200 passengers after it hit a rock while passing too close to the Giglio Island, is taking place in Grosseto Monday Oct. 15, 2012. Captain Schettino, who was blamed for both the accident and for leaving the ship before the passengers, is scheduled to attend the hearing. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

  • FILE -- In this photo released by the Corriere Fiorentino newspaper Friday, March 2, 2012, and taken on Jan. 13, 2012, unidentified people abandon the Costa Concordia cruise ship laying on its starboard side after it ran aground off the coast of the Isola del Giglio island, Italy, gashing open the hull and forcing some 4,200 people aboard to evacuate aboard lifeboats to the nearby Isola del Giglio island. Court-appointed experts have squarely blamed the captain of a cruise ship that ran aground off Italy for the wreckage and deaths of 32 people, but they also faulted the crew and ship owner for a series of blunders, delays and safety breaches that contributed to the disaster. (AP Photo/Corriere Fiorentino) ITALY OUT

  • People aboard a ferry boat look at the partially sunk Costa Concordia wreckage next to the Giglio Island, Italy, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. The first hearing of the trial for the Jan. 13, 2012 tragedy, where 32 people died after the luxury cruise Costa Concordia was forced to evacuate some 4,200 passengers after it hit a rock while passing too close to the Giglio Island, is taking place in Grosseto Monday Oct. 15, 2012. Captain Schettino, who was blamed for both the accident and for leaving the ship before the passengers, is scheduled to attend the hearing. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

  • A view of the partially sunk Costa Concordia wreckage next to the Giglio Island, Italy, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. The first hearing of the trial for the Jan. 13, 2012 tragedy, where 32 people died after the luxury cruise Costa Concordia was forced to evacuate some 4,200 passengers after it hit a rock while passing too close to the Giglio Island, is taking place in Grosseto Monday Oct. 15, 2012. Captain Schettino, who was blamed for both the accident and for leaving the ship before the passengers, is scheduled to attend the hearing. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

  • In this image taken Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012, sunbathers sit in front of the wreck of Costa Concordia outside the port of Isola del Giglio in Tuscany, Italy. (AP Photo, Giacomo Aprili)

  • In this image taken Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012, and provided Saturday, Aug. 18, 2012 by Giglionews.it, ongoing operations continue to remove the wreck of Costa Concordia from the coast of Giglio Island, outside the port of Isola del Giglio island in Tuscany, Italy. (AP Photo, Giglionews.it)

  • FILE -In this picture taken on Friday, Jan. 13, 2012, the luxury cruise ship Costa Concordia lays on its starboard side after it ran aground off the coast of the Isola del Giglio island, Italy, gashing open the hull and forcing some 4,200 people aboard to evacuate aboard lifeboats to the nearby Isola del Giglio island. In a report placed online on Thursday Sept 13 2012 court-appointed experts have squarely blamed the captain of a cruise ship that ran aground off Italy for the wreckage and deaths of 32 people, but they also faulted the crew and ship owner for a series of blunders, delays and safety breaches that contributed to the disaster. (AP Photo/Giuseppe Modesti)

  • Francesco Schettino

    FILE -In this Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2012 file photo Francesco Schettino, the captain of the Costa Concordia cruise ship that ran aground the tiny Island of Giglio leaves the Grosseto court, Italy. In a report placed online on Thursday Sept 13 2012 court-appointed experts have squarely blamed the captain of a cruise ship that ran aground off Italy for the wreckage and deaths of 32 people, but they also faulted the crew and ship owner for a series of blunders, delays and safety breaches that contributed to the disaster. (AP Photo/Alessandro La Rocca, Lapresse) ITALY OUT

  • A view of the partially sunk Costa Concordia wreckage next to the Giglio Island, Italy, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. The first hearing of the trial for the Jan. 13, 2012 tragedy, where 32 people died after the luxury cruise Costa Concordia was forced to evacuate some 4,200 passengers after it hit a rock while passing too close to the Giglio Island, is taking place in Grosseto Monday Oct. 15, 2012. Captain Schettino, who was blamed for both the accident and for leaving the ship before the passengers, is scheduled to attend the hearing. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

  • A view of the partially sunk Costa Concordia wreckage next to the Giglio Island, Italy, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. The first hearing of the trial for the Jan. 13, 2012 tragedy, where 32 people died after the luxury cruise Costa Concordia was forced to evacuate some 4,200 passengers after it hit a rock while passing too close to the Giglio Island, is taking place in Grosseto Monday Oct. 15, 2012. Captain Schettino, who was blamed for both the accident and for leaving the ship before the passengers, is scheduled to attend the hearing. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

  • Francesco Schettino, left, the former captain of Costa Concordia, leaves his home in Meta Di Sorrento, near Naples, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. The first hearing of the trial for the Jan. 13 tragedy, where 32 people died after the luxury cruise Costa Concordia was forced to evacuate some 4,200 passengers as it hit a rock while passing too close to the Giglio Island, is taking place in Grosseto Monday. Captain Francesco Schettino, who was blamed for both the accident and for leaving the ship before the passengers, is scheduled to attend the hearing. (AP Photo/Salvatore Laporta)

  • Francesco Schettino, left, the former captain of Costa Concordia, leaves his home in Meta Di Sorrento, near Naples, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. The first hearing of the trial for the Jan. 13 tragedy, where 32 people died after the luxury cruise Costa Concordia was forced to evacuate some 4,200 passengers as it hit a rock while passing too close to the Giglio Island, is taking place in Grosseto Monday. Captain Francesco Schettino, who was blamed for both the accident and for leaving the ship before the passengers, is scheduled to attend the hearing. (AP Photo/Salvatore Laporta)

  • Francesco Schettino, the former captain of Costa Concordia, leaves his home in Meta Di Sorrento, near Naples, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. The first hearing of the trial for the Jan. 13 tragedy, where 32 people died after the luxury cruise Costa Concordia was forced to evacuate some 4,200 passengers as it hit a rock while passing too close to the Giglio Island, is taking place in Grosseto Monday. Captain Francesco Schettino, who was blamed for both the accident and for leaving the ship before the passengers, is scheduled to attend the hearing. (AP Photo/Salvatore Laporta)

  • Italian Carabinieri paramilitary police officers patrol in front of the Teatro Moderno theater, where the first hearing of a trial for the Jan. 13, 2012 shipwreck of the Costa Concordia cruise liner in which 32 died is taking place, in Grosseto, Italy, Monday, Oct. 15, 2012. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

  • Francesco Schettino, left, the former captain of Costa Concordia, leaves his home in Meta Di Sorrento, near Naples, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. The first hearing of the trial for the Jan. 13 tragedy, where 32 people died after the luxury cruise Costa Concordia was forced to evacuate some 4,200 passengers as it hit a rock while passing too close to the Giglio Island, is taking place in Grosseto Monday. Captain Francesco Schettino, who was blamed for both the accident and for leaving the ship before the passengers, is scheduled to attend the hearing. (AP Photo/Salvatore Laporta)

  • Journalists assemble their equipment in front of the Teatro Moderno theater where the first hearing of the trial for the Jan. 13, 2012 tragedy, where 32 people died after the luxury cruise Costa Concordia was forced to evacuate some 4,200 passengers after it hit a rock while passing too close to the Giglio Island, is taking place in Grosseto Monday Oct. 15, 2012. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

  • Italian Carabinieri, paramilitary police men, patrol in front of in front of the Teatro Moderno theater where the first hearing of the trial for the Jan. 13, 2012 tragedy, where 32 people died after the luxury cruise Costa Concordia was forced to evacuate some 4,200 passengers after it hit a rock while passing too close to the Giglio Island, is taking place, in Grosseto, Italy, Monday Oct. 15, 2012. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)