Britons are heading back across the Atlantic after Superstorm Sandy left many stranded along the East Coast, with flights cancelled, power cuts, roads flooded and transport suspended.

New York's La Guardia is expected to reopen on Thursday, with British Airways flights already landing at Newark Airport and almost all flights scheduled will be running from JFK - but airports warned that many facilities will not be available in airport terminals.

Brits have the option to delay their flights up until 30 November if they had travel planned up until 7 November. Virgin flights are also running as normal.

new york

Commuters wait in a line to board buses into Manhattan in front of the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, New York

Those who stay will have limited tourist attractions - if you discount the dangling crane on a New York skyscraper, which has become a horrifying tourist site for many, according to CBS News.

The crane, now precariously dangling from 70 stories high, is between West 57th Street and 6th Avenue.

staten island

Lisa Kravchenko, of Staten Island, stands amongst flood debris in her princess Halloween costume

The Statue of Liberty remains closed, but the Empire State Building and most museums, restaurants and shops have reopened.

Getting around is the issue. Most of the New York Subway is still closed although buses are running.

Grim reports have emerged of rats attempting to escape the New York subway as the tunnels are drained.

Many rats are believed to have survived the flooding, as they are good swimmers, according to Scientific American's Bora Zivkovic.
target="_hplink">Cars going in to Manhattan will only be allowed to enter if they carry more than three people.

“I know it is inconvenient for a lot of people but bottom line is the city can only handle so much,” New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg said. “I suggest picking up people who will be standing by the bridges. You are their solution and you theirs.”

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A construction crane atop a luxury high-rise dangles precariously over the streets after collapsing in high winds from Hurricane Sandy

Three of the seven subway tunnels that run through the East River and were flooded as Hurricane Sandy battered the East Coast had already been pumped out by Wednesday afternoon.

Both presidential candidates resumed cautious campaigning on Thursday, after president Barack Obama stood shoulder-to-shoulder with Republican governor of New Jersey Chris Christie as both toured the storm-battered state.

obama

President Barack Obama, left, embraces Donna Vanzant, right, during a tour of a neighborhood affected by superstorm Sandy

Sandy left more than 70 dead in the US, causing havoc on the east coast and nearly 70 people in the Caribbean.

Obama will head to Nevada, Colorado and Wisconsin on Thursday.

Republican candidate Mitt Romney held two rallies in Florida on Wednesday.

The Washington Post reported that eight out of 10 voters gave Obama an "excellent" or "good" rating for the way the president has handled the storm and its after-effects.

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  • US-WEATHER-STORM-SANDY

    Passengers crowd onto a bus on First Avenue October 31, 2012 in New York. There was limited bus service in New York while the subway system was still not functioning after being flooded by Hurricane Sandy. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • US-WEATHER-STORM-SANDY

    A man rides a skateboard down First Avenue October 31, 2012 in New York as subway service is still suspended due to Hurricane Sandy. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • US-WEATHER-STORM-SANDY

    Passengers crowd onto a bus on First Avenue October 31, 2012 in New York. There was limited bus service in New York while the subway system was still not functioning after being flooded by Hurricane Sandy. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • US-WEATHER-STORM-SANDY

    Passengers crowd onto a bus on First Avenue October 31, 2012 in New York. There was limited bus service in New York while the subway system was still not functioning after being flooded by Hurricane Sandy. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • US-WEATHER-STORM-SANDY

    Passengers negociate with a taxi driver on First Avenue October 31, 2012 in New York. Yellow cabs were allowed to pick up multiple fares due to limited public transportation as a result of Hurricane Sandy. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • US-WEATHER-STORM-SANDY

    A woman tries to hail a taxi on First Avenue October 31, 2012 in New York. Yellow cabs were allowed to pick up multiple fares due to limited public transportation as a result of Hurricane Sandy. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Motorists sit in heavy traffic while crossing the Robert F. Kennedy Triboro Bridge during the morning rush, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012, in the Queens borough of New York. The floodwaters that poured into New York's deepest subway tunnels may pose the biggest obstacle to the city's recovery from the worst natural disaster in the transit system's 108-year history. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

  • Early morning traffic in Brooklyn moves slowly beneath the Manhattan skyline, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012 in New York. Commuting is a headache for New Yorkers as many subways and tunnels are out of order following superstorm Sandy. New York City moved closer to resuming its frenetic pace by getting back its vital subways Thursday, three days after a superstorm, but neighboring New Jersey was stunned by miles of coastal devastation and the news of thousands of people in one city still stranded by increasingly fetid flood waters. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Joseph Leader, Metropolitan Tranportation Authority Vice President and Chief Maintenance Officer, shines a flashlight on standing water inside the South Ferry 1 train station in New York, N.Y., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the wake of superstorm Sandy. The floodwaters that poured into New York's deepest subway tunnels may pose the biggest obstacle to the city's recovery from the worst natural disaster in the transit system's 108-year history. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

  • Morning commuters ride a downtown-bound, west side subway train toward New York's Times Square, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012. New York City moved closer to resuming its frenetic pace by getting back its vital subways Thursday, three days after a superstorm, but neighboring New Jersey was stunned by miles of coastal devastation and the news of thousands of people in one city still stranded by increasingly fetid flood waters. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

  • Passengers exit a downtown-bound, west side subway train in New York's Times Square, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012. New York City moved closer to resuming its frenetic pace by getting back its vital subways Thursday, three days after a superstorm, but neighboring New Jersey was stunned by miles of coastal devastation and the news of thousands of people in one city still stranded by increasingly fetid flood waters. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

  • Early morning traffic in Brooklyn moves slowly beneath the Manhattan skyline, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012 in New York. New York City moved closer to resuming its frenetic pace by getting back its vital subways Thursday, three days after a superstorm, but neighboring New Jersey was stunned by miles of coastal devastation and the news of thousands of people in one city still stranded by increasingly fetid flood waters. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • The sun rises behind the Empire State Building in New York on Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012. New York City moved closer to resuming its frenetic pace by getting back its vital subways Thursday, three days after a superstorm, but neighboring New Jersey was stunned by miles of coastal devastation and the news of thousands of people in one city still stranded by increasingly fetid flood waters. (AP Photo/Peter Morgan)

  • People wait at a bus stop on Second Avenue between East 23rd Street and East 22nd Street in New York Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. With the city's subways knocked out of service by superstorm Sandy, and a reduced number of city buses operating, New Yorkers are scrambling to commute to work. (AP Photo/Tina Fineberg)

  • Passengers wait for a chance to squeeze into an overcrowded city bus, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in New York. With the city's subways knocked out of service by superstorm Sandy, and a reduced number of city buses operating, New Yorkers are scrambling to commute to work. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Passengers squeeze into an overcrowded city bus, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in New York. With the city's subways knocked out of service by superstorm Sandy, and a reduced number of city buses operating, New Yorkers are scrambling to commute to work. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • This photo provided by Metropolitan Transportation Authority shows people boarding a bus, as partial bus service was restored on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Mass transit, including buses, was suspended during Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday. (AP Photo/Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Patrick Cashin)

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  • Barack Obama, Donna Vanzant

    President Barack Obama, left, embraces Donna Vanzant, right, during a tour of a neighborhood effected by superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012 in Brigantine, N.J. Vanzant is a owner of North Point Marina, which was damaged by the storm. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

  • Barack Obama, Chris Christie, Bob Menendez

    President Barack Obama, center, and and Gov. Chris Christie meet with local residents as they tour neighborhood effected by superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012 in Brigantine, N.J. Also with them is Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., left. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

  • Passengers walk towards the Black Falcon Cruise Terminal in Boston, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, where three of the New York bound cruise ships which were diverted after superstorm Sandy were docked. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)

  • Debbie Baker-Star

    A vehicle is seen in a sinkhole as bus driver Debbie Baker-Star drives a school bus to pick up stranded people following superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Seaside Heights, N.J. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • Barack Obama, Frank Lautenberg, Bob Menendez

    President Barack Obama, center, talks with a local resident as he tours a neighborhood effected by superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012 in Brigantine, N.J. Walking with Obama are Sen. Frank Lautenberg, D-N.J., and Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., far right. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

  • Barack Obama, Chris Christie

    President Barack Obama and Gov. Chris Christie meet with residents of a local neighborhood effected by superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012 in Brigantine, N.J. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

  • Passengers walk towards the Black Falcon Cruise Terminal in Boston, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, where three of the New York bound cruise ships which were diverted after superstorm Sandy were docked. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)

  • Barack Obama, Craig Fugate

    President Barack Obama waves as he follows Federal Emergency Management Agency administrator Craig Fugate onto Air Force One at Atlantic City International Airport in Atlantic City, N.J., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. Obama traveled to region to take an aerial tour of the Atlantic Coast in New Jersey in areas damaged by superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

  • Sand from the beach is seen up to the windows of a home as a vehicle sits on its side partially buried in sand following superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Seaside Heights, N.J. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • Derek Vanderkooy washes mud from his garage in the wake of superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Toms River, N.J. People in the coastal corridor battered by superstorm Sandy took the first cautious steps Wednesday to reclaim routines upended by the disaster, even as rescuers combed neighborhoods strewn with debris and scarred by floods and fire. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

  • Part of the boardwalk is seen after it crashed through the side of a house in Lavellette, N.J., during superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • Sand from the beach is seen up to the windows of a home as a vehicle sits on its side following superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Seaside Heights, N.J. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • Leigh Dworkin, right, waits for a slice of pizza as Carlos Quizhplema, left, and Rosa Rosas work behind the counter at Frank's Trattoria, in New York Wednesday Oct. 31, 2012. The establishment had water but no electricity or phone service. Quizhplema rode his bicycle 3 hours from the Flushing section in the Queens borough of New York to get to work. (AP Photo/Tina Fineberg)

  • Residents of Rockaway Beach receive donations of water, pampers, socks and gloves after hurricane Sandy Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the Queens borough of New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • Anthony Rivera, right, hands out bottled water to residents of Rockaway Beach while they wait on line for pampers, socks and gloves provided by The Legacy Center, after hurricane Sandy Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the Queens borough of New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • A home that was lifted from its foundation sits in the middle of the street as pool of water surrounds it following superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Seaside Heights, N.J. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • An oceanfront home is destroyed in Mantoloking, N.J., on Oct. 31, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

  • Barack Obama, Craig Fugate, Jack Lew

    President Barack Obama exits the Marine One helicopter on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, after touring superstorm Sandy damage in New Jersey. Seen in the passenger windows at right are Federal Emergency Management Agency administrator Craig Fugate, and White House Chief of Staff Jack Lew. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

  • Passengers walk towards the Black Falcon Cruise Terminal in Boston, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, where three of the New York bound cruise ships which were diverted after superstorm Sandy were docked. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)

  • A front end loader is used to move mounts of sand off Seabreeze Avenue in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Coney Island, N.Y. Two days after superstorm Sandy rampaged across the Northeast, killing at least 63 people, New York struggled Wednesday to find its way. Swaths of the city were still without power, and all of it was torn from its daily rhythms. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • An oceanfront home is destroyed in Mantoloking, N.J., on Oct. 31, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

  • City workers clear mud from a subway entry in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the Coney Island section of New York. Two days after superstorm Sandy rampaged across the Northeast, killing at least 63 people, New York struggled Wednesday to find its way. Swaths of the city were still without power, and all of it was torn from its daily rhythms. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • A car from a kiddie ride from the Seaside Heights NJ boardwalk lies half buried in the sand of Mantoloking, N.J. _ about 8 miles to the north from where it originated_ on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. The car was carried by the ocean from the amusement pier that was destroyed in superstorm Sandy. Most of the multimillion-dollar homes along this old-money stretch of the Jersey shore were seriously damaged by pounding surf, wild wind and, in some cases, fire from ruptured gas lines. Numerous homes were destroyed, and some were obliterated, leaving behind just empty sand or maybe a few broken pilings jutting up out of the surf. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

  • ga1101storm gard

    The Fun Town Pier in Seaside Heights, N.J. was heavily damaged by superstorm Sandy. (Photo by David Gard/The Star-Ledger, POOL)

  • The entrance to the Battery Park Underpass in lower Manhattan is filled with water and debris, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012 in New York. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Julio Serrano power sawa a tree uprooted in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Coney Island, N.Y. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • This Wednesday, Oct. 31 2012 photo shows one of many destroyed oceanfront homes in Mantoloking, N.J. 2012 in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. Most of the multimillion-dollar homes along this old-money stretch of the Jersey shore were seriously damaged by pounding surf, wild wind and, in some cases, fire from ruptured gas lines. Numerous homes were destroyed, and some were obliterated, leaving behind just empty sand or maybe a few broken pilings jutting up out of the surf.. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

  • A truck from the New York City Department of Transportation is submerged at the entrance to the Battery Park Underpass in lower Manhattan, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • A truck from the New York City Department of Transportation is submerged at the entrance to the Battery Park Underpass in lower Manhattan, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Water flows past debris from a destroyed home Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Mantoloking N.J. Hurricane Sandy caused the ocean to cut a channel through to the bay, shown flowing here, which effectively cut the borough in two. Most of the multimillion-dollar homes along this old-money stretch of the Jersey shore were seriously damaged by pounding surf, wild wind and, in some cases, fire from ruptured gas lines. Numerous homes were destroyed, and some were obliterated, leaving behind just empty sand or maybe a few broken pilings jutting up out of the surf. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

  • FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 file photo, the remains of a fallen tree litter the roof of a house in North Salem, N.Y. Two boys in the house were killed when the tree crashed through the roof during superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Jim Fitzgerald)

  • The planks of a boardwalk are all that remain after superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Lavallette, N.J. New Jersey's delicate barrier islands, long and slender strips of land cherished by generations of sunbathing vacationers and full-time residents alike, are a hazardous wasteland of badly eroded shore, ruined beachfront homes, flooded streets and damaged utilities. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • ga1101storm gard

    The Fun Town Pier in Seaside Heights has been heavily damaged. Owner Billy Major surveys the damage Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. Only four of the rides on the pier survived superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Star-Ledger, David Gard/POOL)

  • FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 file photo, a firefighter leaves the destroyed home in Pasadena, Md where Donald Cannata Sr. was killed overnight when a tree fell on it during superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

  • Shopping carts full of food damaged by superstorm Sandy await disposal at the Fairway supermarket in the Red Hook section of the Brooklyn borough of New York, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. The food was contaminated by flood waters that rose to approximately four feet in the store during the storm. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

  • Peter Green looks at the wreckage of his oceanfront home in Bay Head, N.J. on Oct. 31, 2012. He says youths stole golf clubs from the ruins of his home on a stretch of Jersey shore that was devastated by Hurricane Sandy. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

  • A helicopter flies above a deserted, sand-covered stretch of Broadway in Long Beach, N.Y., in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. According to police, the city of Long Beach is currently under a 7 p.m. curfew, with violators subject to arrest. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

  • Rescue workers check a home for fuel leaks and other types of damage, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the Staten Island borough of New York. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)

  • A damaged flag stands among the remnants of the boardwalk on Rockaway Beach the damage caused during hurricane Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the Queens borough of New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • A passenger inspects the water level around his vehicle as multiple cars drive through a flooded street, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the Staten Island borough of New York. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)

  • Men throw food in a dumpster that was damaged by flooding at the Fairway supermarket in the Red Hook section of the Brooklyn borough of New York, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. The food was contaminated by flood waters that rose to approximately four feet in the store during the storm. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

  • A National Guard vehicle drives along a deserted, sand-covered stretch of Broadway in Long Beach, N.Y., in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. According to police, the city of Long Beach is currently under a 7 p.m. curfew, with violators subject to arrest. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

  • A woman stands in a street flooded by superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the Staten Island borough of New York. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

  • Madelyn, left, and Aida Pai, right, walk their dog Gigi underneath what is left of the boardwalk at Rockaway Beach Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the New York City borough of Queens. Two days after Superstorm Sandy rampaged across the Northeast, killing at least 63 people, New York struggled Wednesday to find its way. Swaths of the city were still without power, and all of it was torn from its daily rhythms. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • Heavy equipment is used to clear away sand from Broadway in Long Beach, N.Y., in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

  • State police check motorists' identification in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Long Beach, N.Y. According to police, the city of Long Beach is currently under a 7 p.m. curfew, with violators subject to arrest. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

  • The interior of a beachfront home is revealed after superstorm Sandy blew the wall away, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Seaside Heights, N.J. New Jersey's delicate barrier islands, long and slender strips of land cherished by generations of sunbathing vacationers and full-time residents alike, are a hazardous wasteland of badly eroded shore, ruined beachfront homes, flooded streets and damaged utilities. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • Lisa Kravchenko, of Staten Island, stands amongst flood debris in her princess Halloween costume, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the Staten Island borough of New York. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)

  • Joseph Leader, Metropolitan Transportation Authority Vice President and Chief Maintenance Officer, walks around massive fallen beams and other debris in the South Ferry 1 train station Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in New York. Huge amounts of debris and as much as 20 feet of water fills the station and tunnel in the wake of superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

  • Mike Cappucci, 46, of Staten Island, surveys the damage to his home after boats from a nearby harbor were driven inland by floodwaters, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the Staten Island borough of New York. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)

  • Barack Obama

    The Marine One helicopter carrying President Barack Obama lands on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, after the President toured superstorm Sandy damage in New Jersey. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)