Kelly Davidson's Double Mastectomy Tattoo 'Symbolises Transformation After Surviving Breast Cancer' (PICTURE)'

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A three-time cancer survivor has revealed a tattoo of fairies and butterflies in the place where her breasts once were.

Kelly Davidson submitted the candid snap to Facebook’s Why We Ink page, which hosts images of those marking their own battles with the disease or honouring loved ones who lost theirs.

In the caption that accompanies the post, Davidson writes her "tattoo symbolises a transformation, my metamorphosis, like a butterfly I changed on the outside but remained the same on the inside."

kelly davidson mastectomy photo

Kelly Davidson says her tattoo 'symbolises her transformation' after cancer

"It is my badge of honour and strength, a piece of beautiful art that I wear with pride because it represents how I kicked cancer's ass and how breasts don't define who I am as a person or a woman."

SEE ALSO: Facebook 'Removes Image Of Breast Cancer Survivor's Double Mastectomy Tattoo Over Nudity Violation' (PICTURE)

The 34-year-old was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma at the age of 11, the Toronto Star reports.

At 28 she contracted breast cancer and had a double mastectomy, and two years ago she beat thyroid cancer.

kelly davidson double mastectomy tattoo

The 34-year-old is a three-time cancer survivor

Explaining why she opted for a tattoo instead of reconstructive surgery, she told City News: "I went to a seminar in regards to reconstructive surgery I decided that I wasn’t going to have reconstruction.

"I thought about it and talked to my parents and thought there’s more to me than breasts so that’s kind of how the whole tattoo was born.

“I have this beautiful piece of art that I get to look at every day and it doesn’t bother me to think that I don’t have breasts.”

Casting director Jules Fitzsimmons set up the Why We Ink page last year and is creating a coffee table book of images shared, with all proceeds going to cancer support groups.

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Presented by Breast Cancer Campaign