UK video games retailer Game has pulled an ad for the Android-based console Ouya, after it highlighted an emulator which can play pirated Nintendo games.

The diminutive £99 Ouya console features more than 200 games, which can be played on an HD TV, with more being added all the time.

But like most Android phones and tablets, it also runs a selection of emulation apps. And while reviewers have been loathe to mention the emulation features of the machine, The Guardian did admit that for many gamers it "may be the main reason to buy the console".

Emulators allow users to play downloaded versions of old or retro games for consoles like the Super Nintendo or Sega Megadrive, though actually using them can be tricky if you want to stay on the right side of the law.

Companies like Nintendo - which still sells a wide selection of its older titles on the 3DS and Wii U eStore - say that emulators encourage illegal piracy, and make it harder to justify re-releases or extensive Virtual Console offerings.

So when Game featured an image of the Super Nintendo emulator Super GNES on its listing page for the console, you can understand why they might be a bit upset.

News of the listing emerged earlier on Thursday, and it has now been taken down - though the chain of events leading up to it are unclear. The emulator's picture has been replaced by another game - 'Muffin Knight'.

The Ouya is exclusive to Game on the UK high street, but is also available from Amazon online.

Game has not yet commented on the issue.

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