Botox: Is Getting It Really Such A Big Deal?

28/11/2013 16:52 | Updated 22 May 2015

"I keep thinking I might get Botox," I said to a friend the other day. "Everything's starting a look a bit ropey."

Cue gasp of horror, judgey shake of the head and "no, you can't!" Regardless of who you tell, everyone has the same reaction - Botox is a big deal, something you shouldn't do. Something to be frowned upon (unless you've actually had it, obviously).

Of course, I understand - who hasn't winced at an overly injected celebrity and muttered the words, "much prettier before all that work".

But equally, I've seen people have Botox done brilliantly and they look fresh as daisies. Not super young, so to speak, just good. Rested. Like they've never gone to bed in their mascara.

So why are people still so horrified by the idea of a peer getting their forehead a bit frozen? A poll of friends discovered this:

1. It makes you look all shiny and Stepford wife-ish.

2. You'll get that weird puffy-faced look (actually, that's fillers *know-it-all face*).

3. What if it runs and paralyses half your face?

Now, none of these reasons are seem sensible so what should you really consider before going under the needle? I spoke to Marc Pacifico, Consultant Plastic Surgeon and member of the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (BAAPS) to get some good sound advice.

When is the right time to start thinking about getting Botox?

"It's hard to pinpoint an exact date," says Marc. "There's a valid argument in favour of starting early as a good preventative measure when you begin to see fine lines, which is usually in your early thirties. Once lines are properly established they are very hard to eradicate."

How long does it last and do I have to keep going after I start?

Generally Botox lasts three months - sometimes more. If you decide to start having it you have to accept from the start that the effects are temporary and you'll require regular top ups if you like the results.

How do I find a good clinic?

Go to a BAAPS surgeon who is fully accredited. At the end of the day, you're talking about £20 more than someone who isn't and it's definitely worth it.

Does it hurt?

It can sting a little bit.

So, now I've got all the information. What would you do - go under the needle or age naturally and gracefully? Tweet us @MyDailyUK.


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