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'Apollo Moon Landing Was A Hoax' Say All These People Who Are Wrong

07/21/2014 09:31 am 09:31:44 | Updated 21 July 2014

The Moon landings were not a hoax.

Not everyone agrees.

Despite clearly having happened, because of the fact that we can see the landing site, and it's 45 years later, and there's no evidence to the contrary, and just think, Twitter is still resplendent with Apollo-deniers.

Here is a small sample of the people who spent the 45th anniversary of Apollo 11 claiming that the Moon Landings didn't happen, when they did. Either that, or their claim that the landing was a hoax, was a hoax. To which we say... prove it. #hoax

(They did.)

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    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • In this photo taken from a TV screen Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong walks slowly away from the lunar module to explore the surface of the moon
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    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • In this July 20, 1969 file photo, the Apollo 11 lunar module rises from the moon's surface for docking
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    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • In this July 20, 1969 file photo, Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin, the first men to land on the moon, plant the U.S. flag on the lunar surface
  • 4 Moon Landing Anniversary
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • In this July 20, 1969 file photo, Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, right, trudges across the surface of the moon leaving behind footprints.
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    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • In this 1969 photo provided by NASA the crew of the Apollo 11 mission is seen. From left are Neil Armstrong, Mission Commander, Michael Collins, Lt. Col. USAF, and Edwin Eugene Aldrin, also known as Buzz Aldrin, USAF Lunar Module pilot.
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    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center/Flickr
  • Views outside Neil Armstrong'€™s window just after landing on the lunar surface.
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    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center/Flickr
  • Views outside Neil Armstrong'€™s window just after landing on the lunar surface.
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    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. walks on the surface of the moon, July 30, 1969, with seismogaphic equipment which he just set up.
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    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, stands on the lunar surface after the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, 1969.
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    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • Astronaut Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin Jr. poses for a photograph beside the U.S. flag deployed on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission on July 20, 1969.
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    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • An estimated 10,000 persons gather to watch giant television screens in New York's Central Park and cheer as astronaut Neil Armstrong takes man's first step on the moon on July 20, 1969
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    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • In this July 20, 1969 photo provided by NASA shows Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong on the lunar surface.
  • 13
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • In this July 20, 1969, file photo, provided by NASA, Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin, the first men to land on the moon, plant the U.S. flag on the lunar surface.
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    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • A footprint left by one of the astronauts of the Apollo 11 mission shows in the soft, powder surface of the moon.
  • 15
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • In this July 20, 1969 file photo, Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, right, trudges across the surface of the moon leaving behind footprints.
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    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Apollo 11 commander, is seen inside the Lunar Module while the LM rested on the lunar surface.
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    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • FILE - In this July 24, 1969 file photo, President Richard Nixon, right, greets the Apollo 11 astronauts in the quarantine van on board the U.S.S. Hornet after splashdown and recovery. The Apollo 11 crew from left are Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin. Armstrong and Aldrin became the first men to walk on the moon after blastoff from Cape Kennedy, Fla., on July 16, 1969. (AP Photo, File)
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    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • FILE - In this July 20, 1969 file photo provided by NASA, Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin carries scientific experiments to a deployment site south of the lunar module Eagle during the Apollo 11 mission. One experiment involved the inner composition of the moon, and another tried to determine the exact distance from Earth. Aldrin, 84, is asking everyone to remember where they were when he and Neil Armstrong became the first humans to walk on the moon and to share their memories online. (AP Photo/NASA, Neil Armstrong, File)
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    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • FILE - This July 20, 1969 file photo provided by NASA shows a view of the Apollo Command Module with astronaut Michael Collins aboard as seen from the Lunar Module. Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin in the Lunar Module separated from Apollo 11 to prepare to go to the lunar surface. (AP Photo/NASA, File)
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    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • FILE - In this July 20, 1969 file photo provided by NASA, the Apollo 11 lunar module rises from the moon's surface for docking with the command module and the trip back to earth with the earth in the background. Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin, 84, is asking everyone to remember where they were when he and Neil Armstrong became the first humans to walk on the moon and to share their memories online. (AP Photo/NASA, File)
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    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • FILE - In this July 20, 1969 file photo, astronaut Michael Collins wears the space helmet for the Apollo 11 moon mission. Collins, now 83, the command module pilot who stayed behind in lunar orbit as the gatekeeper, also spent decades sidestepping the spotlight. He is making an exception for the 45th anniversary where he plans to take part in a NASA ceremony at Kennedy Space Center on Monday, July 21, 2014, to add Armstrong's name to the historic Operations and Checkout Building. (AP Photo, File)
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    ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • FILE - In this July 16, 1969 file photo provided by NASA, the Saturn V rocket that launched Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins on their Apollo 11 moon mission lifts off at Cape Kennedy, Fla. For the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission, Aldrin asked everyone to remember where they were when he and Armstrong became the first humans to step onto another heavenly body, and to share their memories online. (AP Photo/NASA, File)
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    NASA Goddard Photo and Video/Flickr
  • Apollo 11 crew member Michael Collins appears calm after suiting up activities for his participation in the countdown demonstration test aboard the Apollo 11 space craft along with astronauts Aldrin and Armstrong. The Apollo 11 mission, the first lunar landing mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. (Buzz) Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, ?Columbia?, piloted by Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, ?Eagle??, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished. Date of Image: 1969-07-09 To learn more about Apollo 11 go to: www.nasa.gov/apollo45/ or www.nasa.gov/externalflash/apollo11_40/ Credit: NASA/APOLLO 11 NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation's largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook
  • 24
    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center/Flickr
  • This photograph shows the Saturn V launch vehicle (SA-506) for the Apollo 11 mission liftoff at 8:32 am CDT, July 16, 1969, from launch complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center. Apollo 11 was the first manned lunar landing mission with a crew of three astronauts: Mission commander Neil A. Armstrong, Command Module pilot Michael Collins, and Lunar Module pilot Edwin “Buzz” E. Aldrin, Jr. It placed the first humans on the surface of the moon on July 20 and returned them back to Earth on July 24. Image credit: NASA Original image: www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/history/apollo_11_140716.html More about Marshall Center history: www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/history/index.html Marshall History Album on Flickr: www.flickr.com/photos/nasamarshall/sets/72157636868630444/ _____________________________________________ These official NASA photographs are being made available for publication by news organizations and/or for personal use printing by the subject(s) of the photographs. The photographs may not be used in materials, advertisements, products, or promotions that in any way suggest approval or endorsement by NASA. All Images used must be credited. For information on usage rights please visit: www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelin...
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    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center/Flickr
  • July 16, 1969: The Earth photographed by the Apollo 11 crew on their first day in orbit. Image credit: NASA _____________________________________________ These official NASA photographs are being made available for publication by news organizations and/or for personal use printing by the subject(s) of the photographs. The photographs may not be used in materials, advertisements, products, or promotions that in any way suggest approval or endorsement by NASA. All Images used must be credited. For information on usage rights please visit: www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelin...
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    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center/Flickr
  • Moonbound: Apollo 11 clears the launch tower and heads to space. Image credit: NASA _____________________________________________ These official NASA photographs are being made available for publication by news organizations and/or for personal use printing by the subject(s) of the photographs. The photographs may not be used in materials, advertisements, products, or promotions that in any way suggest approval or endorsement by NASA. All Images used must be credited. For information on usage rights please visit: www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelin...
  • 27
    NASA Goddard Photo and Video/Flickr
  • The Apollo 11 Saturn V space vehicle climbs toward orbit after liftoff from Pad 39A at 9:32 a.m. EDT. In 2 1/2 minutes of powered flight, the S-IC booster lifts the vehicle to an altitude of about 39 miles some 55 miles downrange. This photo was taken with a 70mm telescopic camera mounted in an Air Force EC-135N plane. Onboard are astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr. Date:7/16/1969 NASA Center:Kennedy Space Center To learn more about Apollo 11 go to: www.nasa.gov/apollo45/ or www.nasa.gov/externalflash/apollo11_40/ Credit: NASA/APOLLO 11 NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation's largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook
  • 28
    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center/Flickr
  • Earthrise: view from lunar orbit prior to Apollo 11 landing. Image credit: NASA _____________________________________________ These official NASA photographs are being made available for publication by news organizations and/or for personal use printing by the subject(s) of the photographs. The photographs may not be used in materials, advertisements, products, or promotions that in any way suggest approval or endorsement by NASA. All Images used must be credited. For information on usage rights please visit: www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelin...
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    Euclid vanderKroew/Flickr
  • This is an aerial view of the fully assembled Saturn V rocket with Apollo 11 command module and lunar module in place atop the gigantic structure, being transported to the launch pad. The rockets are assembled in the "Vertical Assembly Building" (VAB) at Kennedy Space Center, then moved to their launch site on the slow-moving transporters. Here the transporter has just finished moving up a five-degree incline at launch complex 39A. Photograph taken on 20 May 1969. Credit: NASA, [KSC] Image #69P-0410 [source].
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    sjrankin/Flickr
  • Edited NASA image of the Apollo 11 mission on the Moon with Neil Armstrong near the LM. Original caption: Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Apollo ll mission commander, at the modular equipment storage assembly (MESA) of the Lunar Module "Eagle" on the historic first extravehicular activity (EVA) on the lunar surface. Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. took the photograph with a Hasselblad 70mm camera. Most photos from the Apollo 11 mission show Buzz Aldrin. This is one of only a few that show Neil Armstrong (some of these are blurry).
    Edited Apollo 11 image of the Command Module in orbit about the Moon, taken from the Lunar Module.
    This photo, from NASA TV, shows the Apollo 11 astronauts on the lunar surface after landing from a new digitally refurbished version of the original moon landing video unveiled in Washington Thursday, July 16, 2009. After NASA couldn't find its original videotapes, NASA and a Hollywood film restoration company took television video copies of what Apollo 11 beamed to Earth on July 20, 1969, and made the pictures look sharper.(AP Photo/NASA TV)
    This photo, from NASA TV, shows one of the Apollo 11 astronauts on the lunar surface after landing from a new digitally refurbished version of the original moon landing video unveiled in Washington Thursday, July 16, 2009. After NASA couldn't find its original videotapes, NASA and a Hollywood film restoration company took television video copies of what Apollo 11 beamed to Earth on July 20, 1969, and made the pictures look sharper.(AP Photo/NASA TV)
    This photo, from NASA TV, shows a comparison of a still from a video copy of Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong stepping on the lunar surface after landing, left, and in a new digitally refurbished version of the moon landing video, right, unveiled in Washington Thursday, July 16, 2009. After NASA couldn't find its original videotapes, NASA and a Hollywood film restoration company took television video copies of what Apollo 11 beamed to Earth on July 20, 1969, and made the pictures look sharper.(AP Photo/NASA TV)
    This photo, from NASA TV, shows the Apollo 11 astronauts on the lunar surface after landing from a new digitally refurbished version of the original moon landing video unveiled in Washington Thursday, July 16, 2009. After NASA couldn't find its original videotapes, NASA and a Hollywood film restoration company took television video copies of what Apollo 11 beamed to Earth on July 20, 1969, and made the pictures look sharper.(AP Photo/NASA TV)
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