Spa Etiquette: Everything You Need To Know

14/08/2014 16:41 | Updated 20 May 2015

Even if you're not a seasoned spa goer, chances are you'll have to set foot in one at some point during your 20s or 30s. (One of your friend's will want to throw their hen do in a spa. Sorry.)

Spas differ from place to place and some are better at particular treatments than others but generally, you can always expect robes, slippers and some of the best scented candles you've ever smelt.

However, as the spa-obsessed will know, there's no point booking yourself in for a massage if you're going to spend the whole treatment feeling self-conscious.


To make your experience more enjoyable, it's a good idea to familiarise yourself with spa etiquette. (Yes, this exists.) One of the first things to consider? Timing.

Although the treatment time might say it will take 90 minutes, this doesn't include the time needed to prepare and relax before and after.

"Make sure you arrive in plenty of time for your appointment so you are not rushed, " says Elemis' product & treatment director Noella Gabriel. "This gives you the chance to have a thorough consultation and mention any concerns to the therapist so they can prescribe the best treatment for you."

Then there's the issue of eating. Don't make yourself feel ill by eating a too much before lying face down for an hour.

"I would advise not to have a heavy meal before a treatment, especially a massage where you will be lying down," says Gabriel. She also recommends turning your phone off as soon as you walk in the door "so you can totally unwind and avoid planning anything too energetic or stressful afterwards."

However, the biggest concern for many women is the being almost-naked thing. When it comes to undressing before a treatment, don't worry if the thought of taking your clothes off makes you feel uncomfortable. You're not the only one.

"Often it's the body treatments like a massage a client might people feel nervous about," Gabriel told us. "They might feel self-conscious about a certain part of their body especially if they have to undress. Therapists have seen all shapes and sizes and are trained to be discreet and put you at ease."

However, if you do feel uncomfortable, the worst thing to do is to lie there without saying anything.

"Speak up if you would like anything different such as an extra blanket, quieter music or if the pressure is either too firm or not firm enough," says Gabriel. "The therapist is there for you."

Just remember - there aren't many moments where you can sit back and do absolutely nothing. That's definitely something to enjoy.



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