UK

Russell Brand Records His Own Version Of Parklife, Critics Not Convinced

10/11/2014 14:34 GMT | Updated 10/11/2014 19:59 GMT

The universe has eaten itself once again. Just days ago, an astute tweeter observed that the musings of Russell Brand in his political magnum opus "Revolution" sounded remarkably similar to Damon Albarn's lyrics in Blur's hit Parklife.

Fast-forward a week, and the inevitable has happened. Russell Brand has recorded his own version of the 90s song, for his YouTube show 'The Trews' (that's a portmanteau of "true" and "news").

The (unusually hilarious) meme all started with this.

Garnering almost 10,000 retweets, it meant that this started happening:

Even Nigel Farage, who said that he sympathised with Brand's core message of revolutionising Westminster cronyism, took a pop at him in his Independent column.

"He looks and sounds different to most of the others on offer. Kudos, Mr Brand - if your attempts are genuine - to try and get more people engaged in the political debate. Oh and might I add: Parklife!," the Ukip leader wrote.

So Brand decided to answer the critics who say he's had a habit of late of taking himself too seriously, and record his own version of Parklife, along with the Rubberbandits.

The video includes a riff on the 'Parklife!' chorus, using different rhyming phrases to decry wealth inequality, Eton-educated prime ministers and the electoral system.

Brand won over a lot of nay-sayers for the attempt at self-deprecation.

But video has yet to attract the universal same praise as the original jibe, with many commenting that the polished parody had made the meme oddly humourless.

The only people who have yet to stick their oar in are the band themselves. Alex James, the band's bassist-turned-cheesemaker, said he hadn't seen the campaign when asked about it by the Evening Standard, but later retweeted one of several mash-ups that were made prior to Brand's official version.

Had enough of this nonsense? Here's Blur's version to remind you how good the actual song is.