TECH
01/10/2015 09:24 BST | Updated 12/10/2015 17:59 BST

Russian Scientist Injects Himself With 3.5-Million-Year-Old Bacteria In Quest For Immortality

A Russian scientist has made a bizarre claim linking ancient bacteria to immortality.

Anatoli Brouchkov, who injected himself with 3.5-million-year-old bacteria has said how it has helped him work longer and avoid the flu for the last two years.

As the head of the Geocryology Department at Moscow State University, he put himself forward as a guinea pig for the controversial experiment in the hope of uncovering the key to finding eternal life.

bacteria

"I started to work longer, I've never had a flu for the last two years," he told The Siberian Times.

"It wasn't quite a scientific experiment, so I cannot professionally describe the effects," he added.

"But it was quite clear for me that I did not catch flu for two years.

"Perhaps there were some side-effects, but there should be some special medical equipment to spot them. Of course, such experiments need to be conducted in clinic, with the special equipment and statistics.

"Then we could say clearly about all the effects."

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While the quest for eternal life is becoming an increasingly trendy pursuit among scientists, Brouchkov's methods are undoubtedly controversial.

Bacillus F bacteria was discovered in 2009 thriving in the Siberian permafrost and researchers hope to decode how its genes help bolster longevity.

So far, experiments on mice and fruit flies have shown reported advantages including it helping old female mice, past the age of reproduction, to produce offspring.

"After successful experiments on mice and fruit flies, I thought it would be interesting to try the inactivated bacterial culture," Brouchkov explained

"Besides, the permafrost is thawing, and I guess these bacteria get into the environment, into the water, so the local population, the Yakut people, in fact, for a long time are getting these cells with water, and even seem to live longer than some other nations. So there was no danger for me. "

However, he does admit that his maverick approach will need proper clinical trials to monitor potential side effects.

"Of course, such experiments need to be conducted in clinic, with the special equipment and statistics. Then we could say clearly about all the effects."