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Stunning Pictures Of The 2016 Mercury Transit Across The Sun

Tiny but beautifully formed.

09/05/2016 16:05 | Updated 09 May 2016

As our smallest planet in the solar system travels across the Sun, there have been various jokes about specks of dirt on computer screens and wonky arrows pointing to said speck. 

Well, tiny it may be, but the pictures of the 2016 transition are still stunning. 

Take a look...

  • Getty Images via Getty Images
    BOYERTOWN, PA - MAY 9: In this handout provided by NASA, the planet Mercury is seen in silhouette, lower left, as it transits across the face of the sun Monday, May 9, 2016 Boyertown, Pennsylvania. Mercury passes between Earth and the sun only about 13 times a century, with the previous transit taking place in 2006. (Photo by NASA/Bill Ingalls via Getty Images)
  • RALF HIRSCHBERGER via Getty Images
    Planet Mercury (L) appears as a small dot as it lines up with Sun and Earth on May 9, 2016, pictured from Potsdam, northeastern Germany (in (C) can be seen a sunspot). It is one of the highlights of the skywatchers' year when Mercury, the smallest recognised planet in the Solar System, the Sun, and Earth all line up -- a phenomenon that happens just a dozen or so times per century. / AFP / dpa / Ralf Hirschberger / Germany OUT (Photo credit should read RALF HIRSCHBERGER/AFP/Getty Images)
  • Yui Mok/PA Wire
    A view from the eyepiece of a solar telescope showing the Transit of Mercury (middle right) - where the planet Mercury passes between the Sun and the Earth and will be visible through a telescope as a tiny black dot moving across the Sun's face - from The Royal Observatory Greenwich, London.
  • Getty Images via Getty Images
    BOYERTOWN, PA - MAY 9: In this handout provided by NASA, the planet Mercury is seen in silhouette, lower left, as it transits across the face of the sun Monday, May 9, 2016 Boyertown, Pennsylvania. Mercury passes between Earth and the sun only about 13 times a century, with the previous transit taking place in 2006. (Photo by NASA/Bill Ingalls via Getty Images)
  • KARL-JOSEF HILDENBRAND via Getty Images
    Planet Mercury appears as a small dot as it lines up with Sun and Earth on May 9, 2016, pictured from Kempten, southern Germany. It is one of the highlights of the skywatchers' year when Mercury, the smallest recognised planet in the Solar System, the Sun, and Earth all line up -- a phenomenon that happens just a dozen or so times per century. / AFP / dpa / Karl-Josef Hildenbrand / Germany OUT (Photo credit should read KARL-JOSEF HILDENBRAND/AFP/Getty Images)
  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
    This composite image of observations by NASA and the ESA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory shows the path of Mercury during its November 2006 transit. On Monday, May 9, 2016, the solar system's smallest, innermost planet will resemble a black dot as it passes in front of the Sun. NASA says the event occurs only about 13 times a century. (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/NASA/ESA via AP)
  • MAXIM MALINOVSKY via Getty Images
    A picture taken on May 9, 2016 in Minsk through a solar filtered telescope shows the planet Mercury (black dot upper left) transiting in front of the sun. Astronomers prepare for one of the highlights of the skywatchers' year, when the Sun, Mercury and Earth all line up -- a phenomenon that happens just a dozen or so times each century. / AFP / MAXIM MALINOVSKY (Photo credit should read MAXIM MALINOVSKY/AFP/Getty Images)
  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
    The transit of Mercury, left, in front of the Sun is seen from St.Petersburg, Russia, Monday, May 9, 2016. The photo was taken through a hydrogen-alpha (H-alpha) narrow spectrum solar telescope that permits examination of the sun's protuberances and showing the surface activity. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)
  • BIJU BORO via Getty Images
    This photograph taken through a solar telescope in Guwahati on May 9, 2016, shows the planet Mercury (black dot upper left) transiting in front of the sun. Astronomers are preparing for one of the highlights of the skywatchers' year, when the Sun, Mercury and Earth all line up -- a phenomenon that happens just a dozen or so times per century. / AFP / Biju BORO (Photo credit should read BIJU BORO/AFP/Getty Images)
  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
    The planet Mercury is seen in silhouette, lower left, as it transits across the face of the sun Monday, May 9, 2016. The last time it happened was 2006. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT
  • Solar Dynamics Observatory/NASA/PA Wire
    Undated handout photo issued by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory of Mercury passing in front of the sun.

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