THE BLOG

The Female Gaze

03/03/2015 13:59 GMT | Updated 02/05/2015 10:59 BST

I've been thinking a lot this week about the female gaze and why it is so unarticulated in our society. I've been thinking about how our lives, as women, are so dominated by the male gaze that it is almost beyond articulation. It is so pervasive that we almost forget that we have the ability to gaze right back.

It is starting to edge its way into our consciousness, as the Fifty Shades of Grey movie is framed with a woman's gaze in mind. Allegedly, it is made for her viewing pleasure, and the conversation is extending into female-friendly porn, in which the focus of attention is not only on the pleasure the woman is receiving, but on the beauty of the man who is delivering it.

But from the onset of puberty - and let's face it, some time before that, if we're honest - women are raised to be aware of the eyes of men upon them. It starts with a gentle commentary on your appearance from both women and men in the family and their friends, and becomes a way of life.

We must look a certain way to please men, we are told, and we find ourselves actively pursuing it, even if we are just on the way to the gym. We run marathons in makeup, we wear heels to go to Homebase and we stop ourselves from having a nice dessert in case our thighs make us into undesirable objects.

No one appears to be actively setting these rules. They're just there. And everyone buys into them and passes them on. Women and men, boys and girls. The fashion designer Oscar de la Renta once gave this advice to women: "walk like you have three men walking behind you." When I first heard it I smiled, and thought, "yeah, I'd sashay away." Recently, though, I've thought, "what happens if I'm the one walking behind three men?"

This week, on one single trip up and down the street I live on, I saw two men empty the contents of their nostrils onto the pavement and one who spat in front of me and then again just behind me. This followed an extraordinary scene where I'd witnessed a neighbour of mine picking his nose in full view of everyone on the tube. I've always been fascinated by these acts of public indecency - especially men who pick their noses in cars, oblivious to who may be watching. Then it occurred to me. They do it because they think no one is watching. They're not used to being watched so they assume it's not happening.

Believe me, there is always someone watching, and it is usually a woman. Just because we're not loudly commenting on what men are doing, it doesn't mean we haven't noticed. Theirs is a shouty spectator sport, ours is a quietly watchful game of chess.

As I've got older, I've had to adjust to the 'cloak of invisibility' slowly descending around me, as the male gaze opts for a younger, fresher target. At first, I felt really sad about it, but as the months have gone on, I've realised that it is one of the most liberating things that has ever happened to me. I've realised that I don't need that approval and I don't need to seek out the validation, as I used to do. What has happened is that my own gaze has been fully activated and I'm suddenly seeing the world outside myself differently. And it's good.

Far from being invisible, I am achieving another level of eye contact with all sorts of people. I make a choice about the objects of my own gaze and often find a woman of the same age with whom I'll exchange a smile, or a younger man, having a sneaky peek. There are people out there who see you in different ways, and not just as a sexual object. It's almost as if not being gazed at as much has allowed me to look outside myself more confidently and find connections that I may well have missed before.

Of course I'm well aware that this could all be just a huge coping mechanism that my brain is initiating to allow me to experience ageing without knifing myself. And do you know what? It might be. My brain never fails to astound me with its ability to take each supposedly devastatingly awful birthday milestone and turn it into something unexpected and rather wonderful. I don't have to make eye contact with the guy who is trying to attract my attention by shouting as I run round the park, or smile when he says, 'cheer up, love.' I can choose to look ahead, and smile at a young woman who is running the other way, or watch a dog fetching a ball.

My gaze is the one that matters, and my eyes have never been so focused on the road ahead.

First published at: http://becauseicanblog.com/2015/02/23/the-female-gaze/