Psychology

We Don't Really Know Why or How Psychological Treatments Work, and We Need To

Cynthia Joyce | Posted 17.07.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Cynthia Joyce

The development of effective and evidence-based psychological treatments is one of the major triumphs of the last decades. And based on this triumph, some folks say we don't really need to know why they work, we just need more of them. But that is jumping the gun on policy, and may just further embed the status quo into our management of mental health problems.

We Should Give Up Encouraging Girls To Do Science, Says Professor

The Huffington Post UK | Jessica Elgot | Posted 14.07.2014 | UK

Schools should "give up" trying to attract more girls into traditional male subjects like computing, engineering and physics, because attempts to brid...

How Can You Live Without Social Media?

Martyn Stewart | Posted 11.07.2014 | UK Tech
Martyn Stewart

I wouldn't hide behind a tree or a parked car to follow my ex-girlfriends every move? Nor would I invite every person I meet in a nightclub, to view my daughter's baby pictures. I don't stroll casually down the street screaming at the top of my lungs 'Well done me!' in regards to my personal achievements as I have no desire to be considered conceited or narcissistic.

Why Do Fewer Than One in Three People With Mental Illness Receive Treatment?

Richard Layard | Posted 04.07.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Richard Layard

While most people with physical illness are in treatment, this is true for fewer than one in three people with mental illness... What could account for this shocking failure? Stigma is one reason. People are ashamed of being mentally ill.

Facebook Almost, But Not Quite, Says 'Sorry'

The Huffington Post | Thomas Tamblyn | Posted 03.07.2014 | UK Tech

Facebook's COO Sheryl Sandberg has formally apologised for poor communication about a study in 2012 which saw users have their timeline's altered to s...

'What's the Problem?'

Richard Layard | Posted 01.07.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Richard Layard

Mental illness is extremely difficult to adapt to - much more so than most physical illness except for unremitting pain. So it is terrible for those who experience it. But it is also bad for business, since it gives rise to nearly half of all days off sick. And it is bad for taxpayers, since mental illness accounts for nearly half of all the people who live on disability benefits. Given all this, you would think that mental illness would be high on the priorities of every government's department of health. But not so.

'If only!' How the Science of Happiness Would Have Helped England Win the World Cup

Andy Cope | Posted 26.06.2014 | UK Sport
Andy Cope

Please note, this article isn't 'having a go' at our failed superstars. The lads return on the early flight from Rio (3 weeks early to be fair) with our pride intact. One hard-earned point off those pesky Costa Ricans may not have been enough to qualify for round 2. But there is a bright-side. No hooliganism. And no biting. Plus Roy Hodgson has been unbelievably articulate and upbeat

The Right Way to do Wrong or How to Deceive Others

Ali Cook | Posted 24.06.2014 | UK Comedy
Ali Cook

We're taught that everything happens due to cause and effect. Whereas a magic trick is an effect without a cause (at least no acceptable cause within the normal parameters of reality). This is why magicians refer to tricks as "effects".

NLP: The Best Medicine?

Stella Photi | Posted 19.06.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Stella Photi

It changes patterns of behaviour - Examples include stopping high levels of anxiety, anger and stress. I am a very motivated person, but for me it has helped me achieve higher levels of focus.

Why We Should Be Grateful to Football: Sport and the Decline of Conflict

Steve Taylor PhD | Posted 16.06.2014 | UK Sport
Steve Taylor PhD

I'm not a big football fan either, but, as a psychologist, I'm aware that the game carries a lot more weight than may be at first apparent. In fact, I believe that the world as a whole has a great deal to thank football for, because of the social and psychological benefits it has brought over the last 100 years or so.

The Psychology of Dancing at Festivals

Lucy Maddox | Posted 12.06.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Lucy Maddox

Festivals might not quite lead to a dancing plague, but there is a sense that anything can happen. Laura recalled the first year of Wilderness festival: "We ended up teaching hundreds of people the conga, on stage with a bunch of naked people. That has to be a professional first! But this is what we love about Wilderness, you never really know where the experience will take you."

How to Beat Perfectionism... and be the Best!

Andrew Cunningham | Posted 06.06.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Andrew Cunningham

For some perfectionism is an internal wasteland where all positives are ignored and life is like wading through treacle. For others perfectionism makes the outside world never enough and disappointment poisons most activities and relationships. Perfectionists walk a tightrope where impending disaster is held at bay with extreme effort.

No One Talks Anymore

Carina Maggar | Posted 04.06.2014 | UK Tech
Carina Maggar

Recent research shows that our phones are proven to be affecting the way we talk, think, have sex, eat and even go to the loo. We have become slaves to technology, only this time, our hands are handcuffed to our phones. Those red circular icons on our home screens have become our very own version of a newborn baby crying out for attention.

Why Multiculturalism is Not Enough

Michael Bond | Posted 02.06.2014 | UK Politics
Michael Bond

How well do you know your neighbours? By sight? By name? Well enough to know the names of their children? In multicultural Britain we should be asking this question more often, for the answer matters a great deal.

Think You Know How To Spot A Liar?

The Huffington Post UK | Georgia James | Posted 29.05.2014 | UK Lifestyle

How many times have you told a fib today? According to Robert Feldman, author of The Liar In Your Life: The Way To Truthful Relationships, it’s prob...

Happiness: Top Tips...

Andy Cope | Posted 27.07.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Andy Cope

If we plotted your 'well-being' (ie, your emotions) during the week, you'd have a natural high point and a natural low point. Your high is when you've got bags of enthusiasm, a twinkle in your eye and a grin on your face. Life feels good. You are flourishing. The other end of the spectrum is the low level you.

Right-Wing Flames That Have Licked Europe Fanned by Lack of Education

The Conversation UK | Posted 27.07.2014 | UK Politics
The Conversation UK

By Ian H Robertson, Trinity College Dublin As Europe wakens to a wave of newly elected right-wing Members of the European Parliament, our multi-racia...

The Art of Decoding Moods

Dr. Bill Cloke | Posted 20.07.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Dr. Bill Cloke

Most people buy into popular culture where we talk about control freaks and moodiness like they are anomalies that we can flick off like lint from our sweater. "Just get over it" rings out from the peanut gallery of nay sayers and pundits like grease through a goose. It's just not that simple. Moods can be complex and almost invisible.

Are Smart Cities Too Clever for Their Own Good?

Colin Strong | Posted 09.07.2014 | UK Tech
Colin Strong

Smart Cities are hot news with many examples where innovation and technology have been drivers of growth and sustainability. But are Smart Cities heading for an 'Uncanny Valley' where the lack of consultation with citizens can lead to alienation and rejection by the very people that these initiatives are designed to help?

Self-Teaching Yourself to Success

Saj Devshi | Posted 30.06.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Saj Devshi

A passing idea to keep my mind occupied snowballed into something bigger and I now run one of the most popular Psychology A level blogs on the internet. If I have learnt anything in the last year or so, it is that anything is possible if you put your mind to it and you're will is such that you wont take no for an answer, even from yourself.

Re-Programming the Mind for Greener Living

Green Futures | Posted 29.06.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Green Futures

How can we intervene in this process to create moments of change? We might consider two ways of promoting habit formation within such 'moments'. First, we are all attuned to the environment around us and there is clear evidence that getting the 'choice architecture' right is critical.

Why Was Shakespeare Performed Inside Broadmoor Hospital - A High-Security psychiatric unit?

Dr Raj Persaud | Posted 27.06.2014 | UK Entertainment
Dr Raj Persaud

Psychoanalysts, including Sigmund Freud himself, have interpreted a great deal of hidden meaning and deep insight into the human condition in Shakespeare's plays. For example, some psychoanalysts see special significance in the title of Hamlet, written in approximately 1601, given Shakespeare's own son, named Hamnet, died in 1596.

Does More Really Mean Less?

Stella Photi | Posted 25.06.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Stella Photi

Amidst incessant TV flicker and commercial bombardment this noisy nation seems destined to become possessed by its possessions. With dwindling opportunity to truly disconnect from everyday distractions it's easy to take the things that really matter for granted. Can we ever find happiness in a new car? Meaning in an iPad?

Where Journalists Find Their News Stories Everyday

Ehsan Khodarahmi | Posted 27.06.2014 | UK
Ehsan Khodarahmi

Publications and journalists have always sent emails to brand owners and PR agencies to find news worthy stories (known as media requests); but this has changed to some extent due to social media.

Saving the World in Heels | Trust Is the New Black

Diana Verde Nieto | Posted 25.06.2014 | UK Tech
Diana Verde Nieto

What were you supposed to be doing when you started reading this column? Chances are, you had a to-do list and this wasn't on it...