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The Sex Trade: Lies, the 'Voice of the Voiceless' and Other Silencing Tactics

02/06/2014 17:17 | Updated 02 August 2014

Most people are voiceless because no one is letting them talk or listening to them when they do. There is a lot to be said for quitting being the voice of the voiceless and letting people speak for themselves. But not by those seeking to abolish the sex trade. Words are put into people's mouths when they can be, and when they can't, those people are silenced and dismissed.

Amnesty International UK has not accepted such tactics, instead listening to people in the sex industry and voting for decriminalising the consensual sale of sex between adults and rejecting the "end demand" Swedish model at their recent AGM. But in the European Parliament, these underhand tactics, which influenced voting earlier this year, have yet to be condemned.

These are 5 places where lies and silencing tactics need to stop:

1. Fundraising - dishonest activists and making children lie

At the end of May, Somaly Mam, a celebrity anti-sex trafficking activist and fundraiser, resigned from her foundation, following the uncovering of lies in her own story of being sex trafficked and the discovery that she forced children to lie about being sex trafficking victims to raise funds. During the 1990s, young girls including Long Pros and Meas Ratha were made by Mam to tell harrowing stories of being sex trafficked in television interviews. Worryingly, this incident of children being forced to lie to raise funds for an NGO is not an isolated case.

2. UK & European Parliaments - bias and libel

In March, the biased All-Party Parliamentary Group on Prostitution and the Global Sex Trade - funded by anti-gay charity CARE - released their biased report attributing quotes to the English Collective of Prostitutes (ECP) that were in fact said by an NHS Outreach Project Worker and using some of the ECP's, Professor Phil Hubbard's and my quotes out of context. The report recommends the "end demand" Swedish model, which does not work to end demand, but does increase danger and stigma.

In February, before the European Parliament voted on MEP Mary Honeyball's report recommending the Swedish model, Ms Honeyball sent an email to MEPs libelling the 560 NGOs opposing her report as being "comprised of pimps". The NGOs included anti-human trafficking, women's rights, HIV/AIDS and human rights organisations, as well as sex worker led organisations - the people she was silencing claiming to care for. A counter-report demonstrating the severe lack of evidence in Ms Honeyball's report was also signed by 94 academics. The Swedish law does not work and is dangerous. Sex workers deserve a law that ensures their human rights as do sex trafficking victims, not a law that fails them. Mary Honeyball's defamation of 560 NGOs should make the result of the vote void.

3. Campaigning - ignored and spoken for

The European Women's Lobby, Equality Now and other groups seeking to "end demand" ignore the danger the Swedish model creates. They selectively choose people formerly in the sex trade who support their approach while dismissing the concerns voiced by sex workers and their call for decriminalisation, which is echoed by the World Health Organization, UN Women, the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Health, the Global Commission on HIV and the Law, and Human Rights Watch among other organisations.

Lori Adorable, a sex worker who I recently interviewed on sex workers' rights and how negative experiences of the sex trade, like mine, are often used by those seeking to abolish prostitution to argue for the Swedish model, recommends "people explore the websites of the organizations who are members of the Global Network of Sex Work Projects." Regularly, these people are spoken for "but these women are speaking for themselves, and they're asking for decriminalisation."

4. Television - being "unrepresentative" and spoken over

Women currently and formerly in prostitution are used in a tokenising way by anti-prostitution feminists and religious fundamentalists pushing for the Swedish law that will result in dire consequences on lives they cannot even imagine living. When we do not satisfy the requirements of their mouthpiece, we are discounted, shut up and shut down.

Laura Lee, whose experience of sex work is positive and very different to my own, is discounted and told she is not representative on BBC Newsnight.

On BBC1 The Big Questions, I am spoken over by a woman claiming to care for women like me, who have had a traumatic experience in prostitution. Though earlier in the programme, she says I make prostitution sound "warm and cuddly". For those who know me, they will know how ludicrous this is.

 
5. Social media - the pimp lobby, dismissing and co-option

Current and former sex workers who disagree with the "end demand" agenda are told they are not representative, they are pimps, they are shills of the sex trade lobby, they are suffering from false-consciousness, and some have received threats of rape and death.

 
I am accused of being the "Pro-Prostitution-Lobby's humane face" who "peddles" misinformation and fights "dirty"...by a former friend. And I am "probably very unhappy", but then she would know through the hours we spent talking on the phone (which, due to being in different countries, cost me hundreds of pounds I do not have currently).

Pimp Lobby Accusations

Note: Sex workers' rights activists are against sex trafficking, and some of us actively engage in anti-human trafficking activism in addition to sex workers' rights activism. These are both human rights issues affecting people in the same industry. Caring about both groups of people is probably the most natural for people who really do care about those in the sex industry and not involved in activism with moral, religious or anti-prostitution feminist agendas to push a dangerous ideology.

I need a laugh not to cry after that.

 
"Before I spoke English and could use Twitter I was representative of some young Indian sex workers," writes Molli Desi, a London based sex worker. "[N]ow I have broken through that technological and cultural glass ceiling I am no longer representative and I can be ignored." She rightly states that this is "a disingenuous argument and disqualifies our attempts to participate. It also allows for the unheard voices of my still "representative" friends to be appropriated and spoken for by others."

 
It is easier to use a woman in the sex trade when she is not present to speak for herself. A vulnerable woman who is homeless and suffering from addiction was used by an anti-prostitution feminist to argue for the Swedish model, which she opposes as does the photographer, Chris Arnade, who took her picture.

 
Women, men, transgender and non-binary people in the sex trade are not only and not always someone's daughter, son, sister, brother, mother or father, but they are always people deserving of their right to be listened to and truly heard.