appearance

If you want to be more attractive to others, it may be time to invest in a new perfume. New research suggests attractiveness
all women everywhere There is no forgiveness on Twitter. In real life words disappear in the air; on social media, they are there forever - you can delete your tweet but others can then still have ownership over your words through a timely screen grab or a re-tweet. An innocent mistake, a flippant remark, a tweet poorly wordsmithed can change your life in a moment. And there are no shades of grey.
Pick up a women's or men's magazine and the dominant features will be appearance, nutrition, fitness, work, sex and romance. We want to be strong, fit, healthy and attractive and enjoy our work and love life. We want them and expect them to go right, but we can be in for disappointments when they don't go according to plan. We need a Plan B: a fit mind to back us up.
It's apparent these trends have even leaked into the lifestyles of the older generation when we look at a recent survey conducted by www.VoucherCodesPro.co.uk. In the study they found that over two thirds of British mothers admitted to being concerned about what other parents at the school gates thought of them.
I have made no secret about the lack of mental health care on offer to myself after my son was born and admitted to NICU. When we were discharged, I was left to my own devices with no offer of aftercare. Why was this
In specific industries a woman's appearance is vitally important- modelling is one of them and you'd think (according to Miller's theory) one where men are feeling very uncomfortable and distracted. But are we applying the same criteria to other industries too?
Have you read about Karl Stefanovic, the Australian TV presenter who wore the same suit every day for a year? He decided to do it to prove that men escape the kind of scrutiny to which women are routinely subjected.