Javed Khan

The proposal was voted down at committee stage in Parliament yesterday.
Hundreds of people have written to their local MPs in the first 24 hours of a Barnardo’s campaign demanding compulsory sex
The scale of sexual abuse of children in Oxfordshire has prompted the local police force to admit it feels "ashamed" of its
This week is National Adoption Week (3-9 November) and this year the focus is on finding new parents for groups of brothers and sisters. According to research carried out by the British Association of Adoption and Fostering around half of the 6,000 children in the UK currently waiting to be adopted are in sibling groups.
In my eyes adopting a child is one of the most amazing things someone can ever do. To give a child a loving and stable family life is a gift beyond compare. For England's 6,000 children hoping to be adopted, every day is a desperate wait. Another day spent longing for the love and support that, through no fault of their own, they are currently being denied. Everyone involved with these brave children wants to see them all get the family they deserve. To make sure each of their dreams come true we need a system that gives them the chance at a new life as quickly and effectively as possible.
It's a shocking fact that just under one million young people are not in work, education or training in the UK today. That's about one in six of all 16 to 24 year olds. Of these, a third have been out of work and claiming Job Seekers Allowance for more than six months.
Over the last couple of months I have been immersed in the breadth of work Barnardo's carries out to help vulnerable young people, and each conversation has brought home to me the huge difference that we as fathers can make to our children's lives.
It is extraordinary to think that slavery of any kind still exists in the modern world. For many slavery is a remnant of a bygone era; an unpleasant and unrepeatable portion of human history. So it's shocking when you learn that slavery not only still exists but is happening across the UK today.
I am awed by the inspirational carers who give a home to children who have often suffered so much and find the courage and empathy to give joy to young lives. The capacity to love, sheer generosity and genuine interest in caring for children that I have seen has given me hope that there are more people out there who care about those children who have no one.
Today as I start my new role as the chief executive of Barnardo's, the charity's purpose remains to transform the lives of the UK's most vulnerable children. Our vision is to realise Thomas Barnardo's dream of a world where no child is turned away from the help that they need.