PARENTS

Gourmet Baby Food - Yes, Really

08/07/2009 19:35 | Updated 22 May 2015

Does your baby turn up his nose at your cooking? Well help may be at hand as a couple of top chefs have created some scrummy-sounding gourmet baby food recipes.

Luke Tipping, the Michelin-starred executive chef of Simpsons' in Birmingham, and Aktar Islam, Laslan's British Curry Award-winner, have come up with the dishes as part of the Taste of Birmingham festival.

They include warm vermicelli pudding, scented with cinnamon and green cardamom, sprinkled with crush pistachio and rusk croutons.

If that doesn't tickle the fancy of your little one, how about dill-seasoned cheddar cheese fish pie accompanied with fresh broccoli and sweetcorn?

Sounds yummy. But I don't have the time to cook this kind of stuff for myself, so how exactly am I going to manage to make it for my baby?

Toddlers and schoolchildren have also been given the gourmet treatment by the chefs.

Meals for them include a sweet potato chicken and apple bake, toasted cracked wheat salad, summer berry shirkhand and spiced tomato and cumin scented rice served with chargrilled summer vegetables.

That'll be a challenge for those parents who struggle to get their children to eat anything other than pasta and yoghurt.

However, this may be a bit unrealistic but it might get parents thinking about feeding their babies something more interesting than mush. There's no reason why babies over six months old shouldn't start eating what you're eating - even if it isn't gourmet fish pie.

Mr Tipping told the Telegraph that a portion of his fish pie would only cost around 80p to £1 to make -- less than some jars available in the supermarket.

"There's nothing wrong with a baby eating a fresh meal, I would rather they did that than give them the usual processed stuff that's out there," he said.

He admitted that there was an ulterior motive for the chefs. "We want to encourage children into restaurants as much as possible," he told the Telegraph.

"It really does start at that level, it's grass roots stuff, you have got try and get children interested in food because they are the future of restaurants."

The meals are going before a panel of babies, toddlers, children and parents this week as part of the Taste of Birmingham festival.

Source: [The Telegraph]

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