The Superstorm which battered America’s East Coast killing at least 50 people was allegedly caused by top-secret Iranian engineering, as championed by Syria.

A translation of a Facebook statement made by the self-proclaimed News Network of the Syrian Armed Forces on Monday reads:

"Sources confirmed to us that Hurricane Sandy that is slamming the U.S. was set off by highly advanced technologies developed by the heroic Iranian regime that supports the resistance, with coordination of our resistive Syrian regime.

"This is the punishment for whoever dares to attack Syria's (Bashar) al-Assad and threaten peace and stability."

sandy

That's some status update: The News Network of the Syrian Armed Forces Facebook page

The article has been shared over 1,000 times and has received close to 350 likes.

Some commenters weighed in to urge Iran to “manufacture hurricane Israel”, while others criticised the post as “complete baloney”.

CNN points out responses from pro-Assad supporters slamming those doubting the claims.

One believer asked: “Why are you surprised by such a heroic act that our special forces carried out with the help of Iranian experts?

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“Yes this is the great work of the brave lions of Syria in retaliation to the evil conspiracy against our great nation. We will have victory even if it will take some time.”

Anti-government protests began in Syria in March 2011. The country has been a close ally of Iran for decades.

Earlier this week, Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei blamed the US and Israel for Syria's bloody civil war.

In a message to Muslims performing the annual hajj pilgrimage to Mecca, he described the bloodshed as a "crime initiated by the United States and the Zionist regime, Israel," punishing Syria for resisting Israeli occupation and supporting anti-Israel Palestinian and Lebanese groups, AP reported.

The Facebook declaration joins some of the weirder conspiracy theories to surround the natural disaster, which caused near apocalyptic destruction and damage estimated at a staggering $50billion (£31billion).

Earlier the storm killed 68 people as it tore through the Caribbean.

Salon.com has compiled a handy list highlighting the other supposed masterminds as gays, attempts by President Barack Obama to be re-elected, and a ruse for the US government to impose gun control.

Uh-huh.

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  • A casket floated out of the grave in a cemetery in Crisfield, Md. after the effects of superstorm Sandy Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Hundreds of people were displaced by floodwaters in Ocean City and in Crisfield. At the same time, 2 feet of snow fell in westernmost Garrett County, were nearly three-quarters of residents lost power. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

  • An ambulance is submerged in floodwaters in the wake of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Hoboken, N.J. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

  • A vehicle drives on a flooded street in the wake of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Hoboken, N.J. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

  • A firehouse is surrounded by floodwaters in the wake of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Hoboken, N.J. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

  • A vehicle drives on a flooded street in the wake of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Little Ferry, N.J. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

  • An emergency vehicle drives on a flooded street in Little Ferry, N.J. in the wake of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

  • An emergency vehicle drives on a flooded street in Little Ferry, N.J. in the wake of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

  • Rescue workers help stranded people out of their flooded homes in Seaside Heights, N.J., following the arrival of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • Rescue workers help stranded people out of their flooded homes in Seaside Heights, N.J., following the arrival of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • A runway at the Teterboro Airport is flooded in the wake of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

  • Homes in Bethany Beach, Del. are surrounded by floodwaters from superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Officials said Bethany and nearby Fenwick Island appeared to be among the hardest-hit parts of the state. (AP Photo/Randall Chase)

  • Floodwaters from superstorm Sandy surround homes in South Bethany, Del. Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/The Wilmington News-Journal, Robert Craig) NO SALES

  • Floodwaters from superstorm Sandy surround homes in South Bethany, Del. Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/The Wilmington News-Journal, Robert Craig) NO SALES

  • Downed power lines and a battered road is what superstorm Sandy left behind as people walk off the flooded Seaside Heights island, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • This photo provided by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority shows the South Ferry subway station after it was flooded by seawater during superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/ Metropolitan Transportation Authority)

  • Debris litters the beach north of Indian River Inlet in southern Delaware after waves churned up by superstorm Sandy demolished hundreds of yards of beach dunes and left state Route 1, the major north-south coastal highway, covered in sand. (AP Photo/Randall Chase)

  • This photo provided by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority shows the South Ferry subway station after it was flooded by seawater during superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/ Metropolitan Transportation Authority)

  • This photo provided by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority shows the South Ferry subway station after it was flooded by seawater during superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/ Metropolitan Transportation Authority)

  • Streets around a Con Edison substation are flooded as the East River overflows into the Dumbo section of Brooklyn, N.Y., as Sandy moves through the area on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. After a gigantic wall of water defied elaborate planning and swamped underground electrical equipment at a Consolidated Edison substation in Manhattan's East Village, about 250,000 lower Manhattan customers were left without power. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • In this Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, file photo, Consolidated Edision trucks are submerged on 14th Street near the ConEd power plant in New York. After a gigantic wall of water defied elaborate planning and swamped underground electrical equipment at a Consolidated Edison substation in Manhattan's East Village, about 250,000 lower Manhattan customers were left without power. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

  • Downed power lines and a battered road is what superstorm Sandy left behind as people walk off the flooded Seaside Heights island, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • This photo taken Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, shows what appear to be transformers exploding after much of lower Manhattan lost power during hurricane Sandy in New York. After a gigantic wall of water defied elaborate planning and swamped underground electrical equipment at a Consolidated Edison substation in Manhattan's East Village, about 250,000 lower Manhattan customers were left without power. (AP Photo/Karly Domb Sadof)

  • Peter Andrews removes belongings from his father's beachfront home, destroyed in the aftermath of a storm surge from the superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Coney Island's Sea Gate community in New York. Andrews, 40, who was born in the house, said "we had a lot of storms and the only damage in the past was when a national guardsman threw a sandbag through the window." He added, the house was in the process of being sold. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • A small shop that rents personal water craft rests in a huge sinkhole on the bayside in Ocean City, N.J. Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 after a storm surge from superstorm Sandy Monday night. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

  • A beachfront house is completely destroyed in the aftermath of a superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Coney Island's Sea Gate community in New York. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • The entrance to a beachfront house is destroyed in the aftermath of a storm surge from superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Coney Island's Sea Gate community in New York. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • A second floor closet is exposed in a beachfront house in the aftermath of a storm surge from Hurricane Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Coney Island's Sea Gate community in New York. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • People stop along the Brooklyn waterfront to photograph the Brooklyn Bridge and the Manhattan skyline, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 in New York. Much of lower Manhattan is without electric power following the impact of superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Marcus Konner, 22, boards his home in the aftermath of a storm surge from Hurricane Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Coney Island's Sea Gate community in New York. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • People walk through the houses destroyed in the aftermath of yesterday's storm surge from superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Coney Island's Sea Gate community in New York. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • Carlo Popolano stands outside his beachfront home, damaged in superstorm Sandy, on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Coney Island's Sea Gate community in New York. Popolano said he was watching the storm with his son and "everything was okay until about 7:30 and then one big wave came and washed away our whole backyard." (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • A beachfront house is completely destroyed in the aftermath of yesterday's surge from superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Coney Island's Sea Gate community in New York. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • A backyard is inundated with floodwaters in the aftermath of Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Lewes, Del. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Randall Chase)

  • A car is upended on a mailbox on Surf Avenue in Coney Island, N.Y., in the aftermath of Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Ralph Russo)

  • This handout photo provided by NOAA, taken Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, shows post-tropical storm Sandy off the East Coast of the US. Campaign 2012 is rich with images that conjure the seriousness and silliness that unfold side-by-side in any presidential race. Who could have predicted that a superstorm would overshadow and scramble the presidential campaign in its final days? President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney revised and re-revised their campaign schedules as Hurricane Sandy, a most unlikely October surprise, barreled up the East Coast and then roared ashore in New Jersey. (AP Photo/NOAA)

  • A parking lot full of yellow cabs is flooded as a result of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 in Hoboken, NJ. (AP Photo/Charles Sykes)

  • A beachfront house is damaged in the aftermath of yesterday's surge from superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Coney Island's Sea Gate community in New York. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • A car is upended on a mailbox on Surf Avenue in Coney Island, N.Y., in the aftermath of Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Ralph Russo)

  • Damage caused by a fire at Breezy Point is shown Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. A fire department spokesman says more than 190 firefighters are at the blaze in the Breezy Point section. Fire officials say the blaze was reported around 11 p.m. Monday in an area flooded by the superstorm that began sweeping through earlier. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • Fire still burns at the scene of a fire in Breezy Point, in the New York City borough of Queens Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • East Coast Begins To Clean Up And Assess Damage From Hurricane Sandy

    ATLANTIC CITY, NJ - OCTOBER 30: People stand on a mound of construction dirt to vew the area where a 2000-foot section of the 'uptown' boardwalk was destroyed by flooding from Hurricane Sandy on October 30, 2012 in Atlantic City, New Jersey. The storm has claimed at least 33 lives in the United States, and has caused massive flooding accross much of the Atlantic seaboard. US President Barack Obama has declared the situation a 'major disaster' for large areas of the US East Coast including New York City. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

  • Homes damaged by a fire at Breezy Point are shown, in the New York City borough of Queens Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • East Coast Begins To Clean Up And Assess Damage From Hurricane Sandy

    ATLANTIC CITY, NJ - OCTOBER 30: A man walks over debsris where a 2000-foot section of the 'uptown' boardwalk was destroyed by flooding from Hurricane Sandy on October 30, 2012 in Atlantic City, New Jersey. The storm has claimed at least 33 lives in the United States, and has caused massive flooding accross much of the Atlantic seaboard. US President Barack Obama has declared the situation a 'major disaster' for large areas of the US East Coast including New York City. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

  • East Coast Begins To Clean Up And Assess Damage From Hurricane Sandy

    NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 30: Ground Zero is seen on October 30, 2012 in the Financial District of New York, United States. The storm has claimed at least 33 lives in the United States, and has caused massive flooding accross much of the Atlantic seaboard. US President Barack Obama has declared the situation a 'major disaster' for large areas of the US East Coast including New York City. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

  • US-WEATHER-STORM-SANDY

    Sailboats rest on the ground after being tipped over by Hurricane Sandy on City Island October 30, 2012 in New York. US President Obama declared New York a disaster area. The death toll from superstorm Sandy has risen to 16 in the mainland United States and Canada, and was expected to climb further as several people were still missing, officials said Tuesday. AFP PHOTO/DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)

  • US-WEATHER-STORM-SANDY

    Boats rest on the ground after floating from their stands at dry dock on City Island , in New York October 30, 2012 following Hurricane Sandy's impact. US President Obama declared New York a disaster area The death toll from superstorm Sandy has risen to 16 in the mainland United States and Canada, and was expected to climb further as several people were still missing, officials said Tuesday. AFP PHOTO/DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Homes destroyed by a fire at Breezy Point are shown, in the New York City borough of Queens Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • US-WEATHER-STORM-SANDY

    Boats rest on the ground after floating from their stands at dry dock on City Island , in New York October 30, 2012 following Hurricane Sandy's impact. US President Obama declared New York a disaster area The death toll from superstorm Sandy has risen to 16 in the mainland United States and Canada, and was expected to climb further as several people were still missing, officials said Tuesday. AFP PHOTO/DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)

  • US-WEATHER-STORM-SANDY

    Residents look at damage left by Hurricane Sandy on City Island, New York, October 30, 2012. US President Obama declared New York a disaster area The death toll from superstorm Sandy has risen to 16 in the mainland United States and Canada, and was expected to climb further as several people were still missing, officials said Tuesday. AFP PHOTO/DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)

  • US-WEATHER-STORM-SANDY

    Boats rest on the ground after floating from their stands at dry dock on City Island , in New York October 30, 2012 following Hurricane Sandy's impact. US President Obama declared New York a disaster area The death toll from superstorm Sandy has risen to 16 in the mainland United States and Canada, and was expected to climb further as several people were still missing, officials said Tuesday. AFP PHOTO/DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)

  • East Coast Begins To Clean Up And Assess Damage From Hurricane Sandy

    NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 30: A truck drives through a flooded street, caused by Hurricane Sandy, on October 30, 2012, in the Lower East Side of New York City. The storm has claimed at least 33 lives in the United States, and has caused massive flooding accross much of the Atlantic seaboard. US President Barack Obama has declared the situation a 'major disaster' for large areas of the US East Coast including New York City. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

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  • Michael Bloomberg

    New York Mayor Bloomberg took all the major precautions to keep New Yorkers safe. He ordered 3,750,000 people to vacate the low-lying areas across the five boroughs and ordered a complete shutdown of the mass transit system well before the storm even hit. According to the New York Times, he even calmly dealt with a huge <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/30/nyregion/crane-accident-at-one57-in-midtown.html?_r=0">crane poised to collapse </a>over a luxury skyscraper.

  • Power Workers

    While most people were advised to evacuate from Sandy's path of destruction, <a href="http://www.thedailybeast.com/galleries/2012/10/30/hurricane-sandy-heroes-from-coast-guard-rescuers-to-red-cross-volunteers-photos.html?huff_e_query=%28red+cross+volunteers%29+%7C+%28shipwrecked+sailors%29+%7C+%28mayor+bloomberg%29+%7C+%28u+s+news%29&huff_e_sorting=recency#a4efc0e0-35ad-42d8-9b29-8aca40743719">power workers knowingly went into the thick of things</a>. According to the Daily Beast, more than 500 power workers came up from Alabama to assist in recovery efforts, and at least 150 came from the West Coast to help restore power in New York.

  • Cory Booker

    Newark Mayor Booker deployed a team in Newark to ensure that the homeless were able to find shelter at an emergency base on Sussex Avenue.

  • Cory Booker

    Newark Mayor Booker deployed a team in Newark to ensure that the homeless were able to find shelter at an emergency base on Sussex Avenue.

  • U.S. Coast Guard

    The crew of the HMS Bounty was forced to abandon ship as Hurricane Sandy slowly claimed the vessel. According to the Huffington Post, "by the time the first rescue helicopter arrived, all that was visible of <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/29/hms-bounty-pirates-of-the-caribbean-hurricane-sandy_n_2037079.html">the replica 18th-century sailing vessel</a> was a strobe light atop the ship's submerged masts." The Coast Guard rescued 14 crew members by helicopter Monday.

  • Martin O'Malley

    Maryand Gov. O'Malley was determined not to let his state lose power. He preemptively told his state's utility providers to get help before the storm hits so they can be prepared. More than 3,000 emergency workers from other states have flooded in to help Pepco, the power company which serves both D.C. and Maryland. According to First Coast News, O'Malley also <a href="http://www.firstcoastnews.com/weather/article/279825/29/Maryland-Gov-Declares-State-Of-Emergency-before-Hurricane-Sandy">declared a state of emergency</a> even before the storm hit allowing the state the ability to activate the Maryland National Guard and provide assistance to local emergency centers.

  • Indiana Red Cross Volunteers

    As the East coast scrambled to prepare and respond to the destruction from Sandy, a crew of Indiana residents began a pilgrimage eastward to help. According to the Daily Beast, <a href="http://www.thedailybeast.com/galleries/2012/10/30/hurricane-sandy-heroes-from-coast-guard-rescuers-to-red-cross-volunteers-photos.html?huff_e_query=%28red+cross+volunteers%29+%7C+%28shipwrecked+sailors%29+%7C+%28mayor+bloomberg%29+%7C+%28u+s+news%29&huff_e_sorting=recency#142b35af-f98a-41af-9044-bc1a7753ef6c">American Red Cross volunteers based in Indiana</a> journeyed late last week to Harrisburg, Penn., where they began staging rescue efforts for the storm that was to come in the next few days.

  • This New Jersey Resident

    After getting hit by a rogue wave on Monmouth Beach, New Jersey, this poor <a href="http://www.kxan.com/dpp/news/strange/deer-caught-in-hurricane-sandy-surf-nd12">deer got swept out to sea</a> in the turbulent currents caused by Hurricane Sandy. A man who was also on the beach at the time of the wave was able to rescue the deer from the water, reported KXAN. It's suffering a broken leg, but is expected to recover in the custody of animal control.

  • Rich Eighme

    A Republican running for the General Assembly, Eighme, spent much of Sunday <a href="http://www.norwichbulletin.com/news/x1440167833/HURRICANE-SANDY-General-Assembly-candidate-hands-out-flashlights#axzz2AixswOI3">walking door to door handing out campaign flashlights</a> in preparation for Hurricane Sandy. A resident of Griswold, Conn., told the Norwich Bulletin that he focused on back roads that could possible lose power within the 45th District, which includes Griswold, Lisbon, Plainfield, Sterling and Voluntown.

  • The Good Samaritan New York Cabbie

    According to Curbed, one <a href="http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2012/10/30/one57_crane_collapse_sends_neighbors_fleeing_midtown.php">good samaritan New York cab driver</a> was "ferrying refugees all over the place," including several from the Parker Meridien where a crane dangled precariously over the building forcing residents to evacuate.

  • The Staff at New York University's Langone Medical Center

    According to the Atlantic Wire, when the power failed at New York University's Langone Medical Center, "approximately 1,000 hospital staffers (doctors, nurses, residents, and medical students), along with firefighters and police officers,<a href="http://www.theatlanticwire.com/national/2012/10/heroes-hurricane/58498/?huff_e_query=%28hurricane+national%29+%7C+%28heroes%29+%7C+%28new+york+city%29+%7C+%28faith%29&huff_e_sorting=recency"> carried 260 patients</a> down 15 flights of stairs, in the dark, with flashlights, to ambulances that transported them to other area hospitals."

  • Vern Gillmore

    According to the Huffington Post, <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/29/hurricane-sandy-vern-gillmore-utah_n_2038607.html?ir=Impact">the 70-year-old Utah man</a> has been volunteering with his American Red Cross chapter for three years and was deployed Monday to help a small portion of some 50 million people who could be affected by the storm.

  • Breezy Point Firefighters

    According to the Huffington Post, a huge fire destroyed 80 to 100 houses in a flooded beachfront neighborhood in New York on Tuesday. More than <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/30/breezy-point-fire_n_2043071.html">190 firefighters were able to contain the blaze</a> but were still putting out pockets of fire more than nine hours after it began. According to HuffPost, "Firefighters said that the water was chest high on the street, and they had to use a boat to make rescues. They said in one apartment home, about 25 people were trapped in an upstairs unit, and the two-story home next door was ablaze and setting fire to the apartment's roof. Firefighters climbed an awning to get to the trapped people and took them downstairs to a boat in the street."

  • Heroic New Jersey Dump Truck Driver

    According to NewJersey.com, thousands of Little Ferry and Moonachie residents were rescued from flooded homes this morning. While most residents were rescued by the National Guard, sisters Lori Turner and Sharon Cardia along with their families were rescued by an <a href="http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2012/10/thousands_rescued_from_bergen.html">anonymous good samaritan dump truck driver</a>.

  • New York Scuba Rescue Team

    Diane Sawyer talks to Terrance Sullivan about the incredible scuba response team.

  • Spencer Service

    According to Patch, a Flatbush, New York <a href="http://windsorterrace.patch.com/articles/hurri-kittens#c">man walked more than a mile in the face of Hurricane Sandy to save a litter of newborn kittens from the storm</a>. As the rain began to fall and the wind picked up speed, Service and his roommate headed downstairs, intending to shelter the fledgling feline family under a cardboard box. Service, however, didn't feel he had done enough to help the soaked kittens. He grabbed a cat carrier from his apartment, lined the bottom with t-shirts, and prepared to embark on the trek to a rescue facility, nearly two miles away from his Flatbush home, where he delivered the kittens unharmed. Note: this is not an actual photograph of the cats.