LIFESTYLE

Okinawa In Japan Has Smashed The Secret To Living A Long Life

02/12/2014 15:05 GMT | Updated 02/12/2014 15:59 GMT

People who live in Okinawa tend to live a very long time. They have: more people over 100 years old per 100,000 population than anywhere else in the world and the lowest death rates from cancer, heart disease and stroke.

The big question is: why?

It's not only genetics, rather their diet. A big part of this is lots of fresh vegetables in every meal (including breakfast).

Another is their preference for medicinal herbs - this practice dates back to 200 years or more.

As for the low disease rates, Dr Mark Stibich says: "This is largely due to the fact that Okinawans simply eat fewer calories than the average person due to a cultural practice of eating until you are only 80 percent full called Hara Hachi Bu.

"Less calories mean fewer free radicals created in the digestive process. Fewer free radicals means better cardiovascular health and less risk of cancer and other chronic illnesses."

Any more secrets?

The Guardian reported Dr Craig Willcox, who has investigated Okinawan longevity and co-wrote a book, The Okinawa Program, saying: "They eat three servings of fish a week, on average ... plenty of whole grains, vegetables and soy products too, more tofu and more konbu seaweed than anyone else in the world, as well as squid and octopus, which are rich in taurine – that could lower cholesterol and blood pressure."

Watch the rest of the video to see what else food blogger Marine found out.

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