POLITICS

Jeremy Corbyn Accuses David Cameron Of Showing 'Contempt For Human Rights'

04/11/2015 12:17 GMT | Updated 04/11/2015 12:59 GMT
Jeff J Mitchell via Getty Images
PERTH, SCOTLAND - OCTOBER 30: Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn addresses delegates at the Scottish Labour Party Conference at the Perth Concert Hall on October 30, 2015 in Perth, Scotland. Mr Corbyn addressed the conference shortly after delegates had agreed to discuss a motion opposing the renewal of Trident at its conference in Perth on Sunday, Mr Corbyn told delegates they would be taking a decision for the good of the people of Scotland, and for the good of our party. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Jeremy Corbyn has accused David Cameron of showing "contempt for human and democratic rights" and threatening national security by inviting the Egyptian president to Britain.

In a statement issued moments before prime minister's questions began on Wednesday, the Labour leader said the prime minister should also suspend arms exports to Egypt until "democratic and civil rights are restored".

david cameron sisi

David Cameron meeting President Sisi in New York

Corbyn said today: "David Cameron’s invitation to Britain today of the Egyptian president and coup leader Abdel Fatah al-Sisi shows contempt for human and democratic rights and threatens, rather than protects, Britain’s national security."

"Support for dialogue and negotiated conflict resolution in the Middle East is vital to us all. But to welcome and bolster with military support the coup leader who overthrew a democratically elected president in 2013 and has presided over the killing and jailing of many thousands since makes a mockery of government claims to be promoting peace and justice in the region.

"Support for dictatorial regimes in the Middle East has been a key factor fuelling the spread of terrorism. Rather than rolling out the red carpet to President Sisi, the prime minister should suspend arms exports to Egypt until democratic and civil rights are restored."

Corbyn's attack on Cameron for making a decision that threatens national security will be seen as a direct response to Tory attempts to paint the Labour leader as weak on security.

Shortly after Corbyn was elected leader, Cameron said the Labour Party was "now a threat to our national security, our economic security and your family's security".