PARENTS

Poignant Photo Series Of Premature Babies 'Then And Now' Shows How Far They've Come

09/11/2015 13:28 GMT | Updated 09/11/2015 13:59 GMT

A father who photographs children holding pictures of themselves as premature babies has added six new shots to his collection, highlighting how these babies grow and develop.

Canadian-based Red Méthot - father of two children who were born prematurely - started the series called 'Les Prémas' in September 2015. The album has been shared 14,000 times.

Méthot wrote: "This album shows portraits of people who were born prematurely and sometimes had a difficult journey in early life.

"They are photographed holding in their hands a picture of them taken during this period. You can see what they have become."

Violette, née à 24 semaines.

Posted by RedM on Monday, 2 November 2015


Méthot said before his children were born, he knew nothing about premature birth.

He told ABC News: "I decided to do a photo project to that would help make people know more about this topic.

"I was looking for a way to show how premature babies are great fighters."

The father-of-two realised photographing babies in hospital would be difficult, so he photographed his two sons holding photos of themselves as babies.

Soon, other parents of premature children came forward and Méthot's series has continued to expand.

Léa-Rose, née à 26 semaines.

Posted by RedM on Sunday, 25 October 2015

Lana, née à 30 semaines.

Posted by RedM on Sunday, 25 October 2015

Justine, née à 30 semaines.

Posted by RedM on Sunday, 25 October 2015

Alexyane, née à 30 semaines.

Posted by RedM on Sunday, 25 October 2015

Élôdie, née à 23 semaines.

Posted by RedM on Sunday, 18 October 2015


See a selection of the older photos from the series below.

Before And After Photos Of Premature Babies

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Before And After Photos Of Premature Babies