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Eight Questions From Student Travellers Following Brexit

28/06/2016 15:51

With the Brexit decision confirmed last week, we've had a lot of questions over the weekend from our members as to what this means for their travel arrangements and longer term prospects. Below are answers to some of the most frequently asked.

Short-Term

The 140 Characters Version: Britain remains a member of the EU for at least two years, and nothing will change for travellers between Britain and the EU.

"I've already got a flight booked to Europe, what do I need to do?"

In short, nothing different. The UK is still a member of the European Union for at least two more years and so the same rights of travel and freedom of movement remain in place.

"Will travel be more expensive to Europe?"

Right now, we've not seen any dramatic changes in the price of airfare from the UK. Prices remain fair and seasonally competitive. Where travel may be more expensive right now is when you get to Europe with the weak pound against the Euro.

"I'm an international student studying in the UK, can I still travel to Europe?"

Yes! Nothing has changed nor will change for at least two years time. Britain remains a member of the European Union throughout this period.

"Will my EHIC (European Health Insurance Card) still cover me?"

Your EHIC card is still valid and will remain valid throughout the minimum of two years until Britain leaves the EU. This is one of many things that will need to be finalised longer term between the UK and other EU countries.

"I'm studying abroad in Europe, do I need to come home?"

No. For the next two years (at a minimum) Britain remains a member of the European Union and so you're entitled to participate in the Erasmus Programme. After that, nothing can be confirmed yet.

Longer-Term

The 140 Characters Version: A lot is uncertain as of right now and the coming weeks will truly define opportunities for younger people for an entire generation.

"Will the cost of flights increase in the future to Europe?"

Expectations are that the UK government will negotiate access to the EU's common aviation market. This will enable Britain to remain competitive on price and allow entry to the open skies arrangements we currently have today.

"Will I still be able to study abroad in Europe?"

It remains unclear at this early stage what the impact of the vote to leave the EU will have on this subject. However, Britain is a leading member of the Erasmus Programme and will do every effort to maintain its participation in the programme.

"Will I still be able to study abroad in the UK?"

Again this remains unclear until negotiations begin as to Britain's Exit from the EU. Right now, students from across the world can study in the UK under a Tier 4 Visa. Whether European students will have to conform to this or other legislation is still to be determined.

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