POLITICS

Eddie Izzard Releases Campaign Video In Bid To Win Labour NEC Seat

Comedian wants his fans to join the party and vote for him.

26/10/2017 17:00 BST | Updated 27/10/2017 12:09 BST

Eddie Izzard has called on his fans to join the Labour Party to boost his bid to win a place on its ruling committee.

In a video to be posted on his Facebook and Twitter accounts on Thursday evening, seen by HuffPost UK, Izzard talks about joining Labour in 1995, coming out in 1985 and his social and political activism. 

The actor, comedian and campaigner wants to win a place on the party’s National Executive Committee, which oversees its general direction and policy-making process, as well as dealing with disputes and disciplinary procedures.

In his video Izzard, who tried unsuccessfully to win a seat on the committee last year, says: “I’ve been a member of the Labour party since 1995.

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Eddie Izzard on the Labour campaign trail in London.

“I’ve been out as transvestite/transgender - the language has changed over the years - I’ve been out since 1985, 32 years.

“I’m a fighter, I’m an activist. I run marathons because I think it’s good to give back. And I’m now performing stand up comedy in four different languages. Well, English and three other languages.

“So I like fighting. I have fought in campaigns. If you’re a Labour party activist you could well have seen me out there. I’m self motivated, I’m not being wheeled out by anyone. I’m self-wheeling.”

Nominations for three NEC positions open this week and new members can join and vote for their preferred candidates until November 16.

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Corbyn-supporting campaign group Momentum has already released its slate of four preferred candidates - who are likely to win - including founder Jon Lansman.

Izzard launched his bid earlier this week, saying he was proud of the Labour Party but that he thought it could do better.

He called for an end to “politics as usual” as part of a platform focused on making Labour more welcoming to groups who often feel isolated or excluded from taking part in the political process.