These doctors are risking their lives traversing mine-ridden Syrian countryside to reach children who desperately need medical care. 

This Unicef medical truck flits between villages in southern Aleppo, an area which has been torn apart by the conflict in Syria. 

A team of nine - comprised of two doctors, two specialists and medical students - treat around 100 people every day, setting up makeshift clinics in schools, houses and mosques. 

Thousands of people are returning to Syria despite ongoing violence and the fact that some areas lack basic facilities. 

The team treats people with injuries as well as pregnant women, child illness and chronic disease. 

Mohammed, a 23-year-old medical student with the team, said: “I chose the medical field to volunteer because the situation was tragic in Aleppo and I wanted to serve people.

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Mohammed said landmines in Syria's Aleppo pose a risk to the medical truck 

“Thankfully, through the training I received, I was able to help people. 

“We serve five villages. In some villages, we treat people at the mosque, in others in an empty classroom.

“Some people offer rooms in their houses for us to operate in. We don’t have fixed locations, we sometimes have to switch locations.

“We face many challenges and dangers but no matter how difficult they are,
we have to continue our work. 

“One danger is that of mine risk. Many conflict-ridden areas still have mines, but the mobile health clinic is very important because it provides people with
important medical services.”

The medical truck is often the first-responder when people become trapped by the conflict, but it needs more funding to continue its work. 

This Christmas, HuffPost UK has teamed up with Unicef to appeal for more funding to help children affected by the conflict in Syria. 

HuffPost UK Christmas Appeal 2017
To make a donation to Unicef and to help the children of Syria this winter, please visithttp://unicef.uk/huffpost

HuffPost UK Christmas Appeal 2017
To make a donation to Unicef and to help the children of Syria this winter, please visit http://unicef.uk/huffpost