Terrible Night's Sleep? Your Partner's Annoying Habits Are Probably To Blame

The spare bedroom has never looked so inviting 😴

14/11/2016 15:21

Fed up of waking up tired every day? You might want to rethink your bedroom arrangement.

A new survey revealed that almost one third of people are disrupted regularly by their partner’s night time habits, with most citing snoring as the biggest problem.

For those who are prone to disrupted sleep, experts recommend sleeping in separate beds in different rooms.

And it’s a move that could, in the long run, benefit your health.

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It’s estimated that one third of the population suffers from severe sleep deprivation.

“Sleep is a requirement just like food. Good quality sleep ensures your mental and physical health remains optimal,” Dr Nazim Nathani, from the London Sleep Centre, previously told The Huffington Post UK.

“Lack of sleep has been attributed to hopelessness, memory problems and irritability.”

Chronic sleep deprivation, where someone routinely sleeps for less than the amount required (fewer than seven hours a night), can result in health problems such as obesity, Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and high blood pressure. 

While the new study by Silentnight and the University of Leeds revealed that your other half is most likely scuppering your chances of a good night’s sleep, having someone to kiss goodnight does have its benefits, as 71% of people said they slept better after giving their loved one a kiss and 70% said they slept better after telling their partners, ‘I love you’. 

“Almost a third of Brits say they can’t get a good night’s sleep because they are disturbed by their partner. So for many people it’s clear that sleeping in separate rooms might make for a better more restful sleep,” said sleep expert Dr Nerina Ramlakhan.

“However sleeping on your own isn’t the full solution; it’s worth considering how you say goodnight to your partner before they head off to the spare room.”

Dr Nerina continued: “To be able to fall into a restorative sleep, we need to feel safe, secure and protected, and relationships can bring us this sense of security.

“Sharing a kiss with the one you love before bedtime shifts your mindset away from the stress of the day - 36% of us rely on this relief, saying we feel that if we don’t get the chance to kiss our loved ones goodnight, our sleep would be disturbed.”

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