Struggling To Sleep? Wear Your Shades Before Bed, Researcher Suggests

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27/09/2016 13:53

If you’ve tried every trick in the book to fall asleep and are still failing miserably, sleep researcher Glenn Landry has your back.

The expert in snoozing has suggested people wear sunglasses at night to help them drift off. 

He said that too much light exposure at night - from laptops, mobile phones and TV screens - can mess up the body’s circadian clock. 

As such, he advised wearing shades two hours before bedtime to try and help keep your body clock in check. Well, if it works for him...

Carol Yepes via Getty Images

Landry, who studies sleep as a postdoctoral research fellow at The University Of British Columbia’s Ageing, Mobility, and Cognitive Neuroscience Lab, told CBC News: “Beginning at eight at night, two hours before [the] time I want to go to bed, I wear sunglasses.

“Not because my future’s so bright, but because I’m trying to avoid light. I’m trying to tell my clock that this is the end of the day.”

If getting a good night’s kip is top of your priorities, then don your sunglasses for a bit and avoid doing the following before bedtime:

1. Don’t drink tea

You might be already avoiding coffee before bed, but tea is also a major culprit for keeping you up all night. 

2. Don’t argue with your partner

Fighting with your other half results in you then lying awake all night, over-thinking what’s been said. Don’t do it. 

3. Don’t let pets on your bed

While they’re snuggly and warm, when pets sleep on the bed it can be virtually impossible to get a good night’s rest.

4. Don’t sleep with your tech

Whether it’s a mobile phone, tablet or laptop, having tech near your bed is never a good idea as blue light from electronic devices can stimulate your brain and keep you up. 

5. Keep devices out of the room

If possible, don’t sleep with devices in the room. Also, stop checking texts and emails late at night - it doesn’t help you switch off. Aim to stop using your devices at least one hour before bed. 

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